September 26

09-26

Boston Baked Beans
Mustard Pickles
Raisin Brown Bread
Dressed Lettuce
Orange Jelly
*Walnut Cake
Café Noir

In 1914 September 26 was a Saturday.

Beans and brown bread, how Boston can you get? I figure that Raisin Brown Bread is Boston Brown Bread with raisins added before steaming.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

July 29

07-29

*Bisque of Lobster
Braised Calf’s Liver, Brown Sauce
Potatoes au Gratin
Shell Beans
Cucumber Salad
Cream Puffs
Café Noir

In 1914 July 29 was a Wednesday. We had lobster yesterday as well. Must be summer!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

July 23

07-23

*Veal and Sago Soup
O’Brion Potatoes
Shell Beans
Corn on the Cob
Berry Pie
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 July 23 was a Thursday.

These days “sago” is often a synonym for tapioca, but they come from different plants. Fannie is very specific: Tapioca is starch obtained from tuberous roots of the bitter cassava, native of South America. Sago is starch obtained from sago palms, native of India. (The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 6)

The Berry Pie might be blueberry or blackberry.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

June 29

06-29

Cold Sliced Roast Beef
Piedmont Potato Croquettes
Shell Beans
*Cheese and Currant Salad
Wheat Crispies
Club Indian Pudding

In 1914 June 29 was a Monday. As often happens, we are having leftovers from Sunday’s roast.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!