*Cadillac Chicken, March 10
Wipe a chicken, dressed same as for broiling, sprinkle with salt and pepper, place in a well-greased broiled and broil over a clear fire eight minutes. Remove to pan and rub over with the following mixture: Cream four tablespoons butter and add one teaspoon made mustard, one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon vinegar and one-half teaspoon paprika. Sprinkle with three-fourths cup buttered, soft bread crumbs and bake until chicken is tender and crumbs are browned.

*Café Frappé, May 9
Beat white of one egg slightly, add one-half cup cold water, and mix with one-half cup ground coffee; turn into scalded coffee-pot, add four cups boiling water, and boil one minute; place on back of range ten minutes; strain, add one cup sugar, cool, and freeze. Serve in coupe glasses, with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored.

Café Noir, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 38
January 4, 6, 11, 13, 15-18, 20, 24, 26, 28, February 4, 6, 8, 15, 21, 22, March 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 17, 20, 22, 25, 26, April 5, 7, 9, 12, 14, 16, 23, 27, May 7, 11, 13, 18-20, 24, 26, 28, 30, June 11, 14, 19, 22, 24, 25, 28, July 14, 23, 25, 26, 29, August 12, 16, September 5, 7, 10, 13, 17, 20, 23, 26, 27, 30, October 3, 4, 6, 11, 14, 16, 18, 24, 26, 28, 31, November 1, 2,  5, 8, 11, 15, 18, 20, 26, 29, December 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 25, 27, 29
For after-dinner coffee use twice the quantity of coffee, or half the amount of liquid, given in previous recipes. Filtered coffee is often preferred where milk or cream is not used, as is always the case with black coffee. Serve in after-dinner coffee cups, with or without cut sugar.
Coffee retards gastric digestion; but where the stomach has been overtaxed by a hearty meal, café noir may prove beneficial, so great are its stimulating effects.

Café Parfait,  The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 451
August 9
1 cup milk                                     1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup Mocha coffee                 1 cup sugar
Yolks 3 eggs                                 3 cups thin cream
Scald milk with coffee, and add one-half the sugar; without straining, use this mixture for making custard, with eggs, salt, and remaining sugar; add one cup cream and let stand thirty minutes; cool, strain through double cheese-cloth, add remaining cream, and freeze. Line a mould, fill with Italian Meringue, cover, pack in salt and ice, using two parts crushed ice to one part rock salt, and let stand three hours.

*Canadian Meat Pie, October 10
Remove meat from knuckle of veal. Put bones in stew pan, cover with cold water and add two slices onion, one slice carrot, and twelve peppercorns. Bring to boiling point, add meat, and let simmer until tender. Remove meat and reduce stock to two cups. Put one-half pound slice ham in frying pan, cover with lukewarm water and let stand one hour. Brown four tablespoons butter, add four tablespoons flour and stock; then add veal and ham cut in cubes and simmer twenty minutes. Cover with pastry top.

Canapés à la Rector, A New Book of Cookery, p. 379
October 14
Cut stale bread in one-fourth-inch slices, then in strips three and one-half inches long by one and one-half inches wide. Toast on one side and spread untoasted side with caviare. Divide diagonally into three sections, having two end ones half a square. Sprinkle centre with finely chopped cucumber pickles and ends with finely chopped red pepper. Separate sections with a piece cut from a fillet of anchovy.

*Candied Sweet Potatoes, October 3
Wash and cook six medium-sized potatoes in boiling salted water to cover. Drain, peel, cut in halves, lengthwise, arrange in buttered baking dish, sprinkling each layer with sugar, using one cup in all. Pour over one-half cup melted butter. Cook in a slow oven two hours.

*Canteloupe Suprême, August 16
 Wipe canteloupes[sic], cut in halves crosswise, remove seeds and stringy portion, and shape into balls, using a French potato ball cutter, or cut in three-fourth-inch cubes. Arrange in double coupe or grape-fruit glasses (having crushed ice in outer glass), sprinkle with sugar, and pour over each one-fourth teaspoon maraschino.

*Canton Cream, January 18
October 4
Soak one tablespoon granulated gelatine in one-fourth cup cold water, and add to custard made of one cup milk, yolks of two eggs, one-fourth cup sugar, and a few grains salt. Strain, chill in pan of ice water, add one tablespoon wine, one-half tablespoon brandy, two tablespoon ginger syrup, and one-forth cup Canton ginger, cut into pieces, and when mixture begins to thicken fold in whip from two and one-half cups thin cream. Mould and chill.

Caper Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 267
February 17, May 5, June 30
To Drawn Butter Sauce add one-half cup capers drained from their liquor. Serve with boiled mutton.

*Caramel Bread Pudding, September 19
Caramelize one-half cup sugar and add four cups scalded milk. When caramel has dissolved, add two cups stale bread crumbs and let soak thirty minutes. Beat two eggs slightly, add two-thirds cup sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, and one teaspoon vanilla. Add to first mixture, turn into buttered pudding dish and bake one hour. Serve with whipped cream sweetened and flavored with vanilla.

Caramel Custard, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 415
March 1, April 24, July 13, November 22
4 cups scalded milk             1/2 teaspoon salt
5 eggs                                    1 teaspoon vanilla
                        1/2 cup sugar
Put sugar in omelet pan, stir constantly over hot part of range until melted to a syrup of light brown color. Add gradually to milk, being careful that milk does not bubble up and go over, as is liable on account of high temperature of sugar. As soon as sugar is melted in milk, add mixture gradually to eggs slightly beaten; add salt and flavoring, then strain in buttered mould. Bake as custard. Chill, and serve with Caramel Sauce.

Caramel Ice Cream, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 445
March 29, July 22, August 13
1 quart cream                      1 egg
2 cups milk                          1 tablespoon flour
1 1/3 cups sugar                  1/8 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla
Prepare same as Vanilla Ice Cream II, using one-half sugar in custard; remaining half caramelize, and add slowly to hot custard.
To Caramelize Sugar. Put in a smooth granite saucepan or omelet pan, place over hot part of range, and stir constantly until melted and of the color of maple syrup. Care must be taken to prevent sugar from adhering to sides of pan or spoon.

*Caramel Junket, September 28
Heat 2 cups milk until lukewarm. Caramelize one-third cup sugar, add one-third cup boiling water, and cook until syrup is reduced to one-third cup. Cool, and add milk slowly to syrup. Reduce one junket tablet to powder, add to mixture, with few grains salt and one teaspoon vanilla. Turn into a glass dish, let stand in warm place until set, then chill. Cover with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored, and sprinkle with chopped nuts.

Caramel Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 415
March 1, July 13, November 22
1/2 cup sugar                         1/2 cup boiling water
                                                                       Miss Parloa
Melt sugar as for Caramel Custard, add water, simmer ten minutes; cool before serving.

*Caraway Seed Cookies, May 31
November 2
Cream one cup butter and add gradually one cup of sugar. Add one egg and beat’ then add another egg and continue the beating. Add one-fourth teaspoon soda dissolved in two tablespoons milk, and one-fourth teaspoon salt, two cups bread flour, and one tablespoon caraway seeds. Toss on a floured cloth and pat and roll to one-fourth inch in thickness. Shape with a small round cutter, first dipped in flour. Arrange on a buttered sheet and bake in a moderate oven.

*Carlton Salad, June 21
Separate French endive, clean, drain and chill. Cut cold cooked beets in one-quarter-inch slices and slice into  rings and fancy shapes. Arrange pieces of endive through beet rings. Arrange on crisp lettuce leaves, allowing two leaves, two bunches of endive in rings and five shapes for each portion. Serve with French dressing to which is added three tablespoons of chopped walnut meats.

Carrots, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 288
May 23, June 6
Carrots may always be found in market. New carrots appear last of April, and are sold in bunches; these may be boiled and served, but carrots are chiefly used for flavoring soups, and for garnishing, on account of their bright color. To prepare carrots for cooking, wash and scrape, as best flavor and brightest color are near the skin.

Carrots à la Poulette, What to Have for Dinner, p. 84
June 30
Wash and scrape carrots< and cut in small cubes; there should be two cups. Cover with boiling water and let stand five minutes. Drain and cook until soft in a small quantity of boiling salted water to which is added one-half tablespoon butter; again drain. Melt three tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour and pour on. gradually, while stirring constantly, one cup white stock and one-half cup cream. Add carrots, and one- half teaspoon lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper. As soon as thoroughly heated, add yolks two eggs slightly beaten.

Casserole of Beef, A New Book of Cookery, p. 115
April 15
Cut cold roast beef and cold broiled steak, alone or in combination, in one-inch cubes; there should be one quart. Put in a casserole dish and add two cups brown sauce or beef gravy, one-half cup celery cut in small pieces, one-half cup carrot cut in small cubes, one onion thinly sliced, one cup canned tomatoes, one teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce, one-half teaspoon salt and one-eighth teaspoon pepper. Cover and bake one hour; then add one cup peas, beans or mushrooms, canned or fresh, one cup potato balls or cubes, which have been cooked in boiling salted water ten minutes, and two tablespoons Sherry wine. Again cover and cook thirty minutes, or until potatoes are soft. Serve from casserole.

*Cauliflower, Huntington, November 18
Drain a cooked cauliflower, separate into flowerets and pour over the following sauce: Mix the yolks of two eggs, one-fourth cup cream, one-half teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon nutmeg and the juice of one-half lemon. Cook in double boiler, stirring constantly until mixture thickens. Add two tablespoons butter, bit by bit, and when melted serve at once.

Cauliflower Polonaise, A New Book of Cookery, p. 165
Remove leaves from cauliflower, cut off stalk, and soak 30 minutes (head down) in cold water to cover. Cook (head up) twenty-five minutes or until tender in one quart boiling water to which have been added one pint milk and one tablespoon salt. Drain, place on a hot serving dish, sprinkle with the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, forced through a purée strainer, and mixed with one tablespoon finely chopped parsley and one third cup coarse bread crumbs cooked in butter until delicately browned.

Caviare Canapés, What to Have for Dinner, p. 191
April 5, June 17
Cut stale bread in one-fourth inch slices; then shape into crescents, using a round cutter. Sauté in butter until delicately browned, and, when cold, spread with caviare. Serve each canapé on a fancy plate and garnish with a sprig of watercress.

Celery, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 290
January 15, January 20, February 13, March 8, September 21, October 13, November 11 November 15, November 29
Celery may be obtained from last of July until April. It is best and cheapest in December. Celery stalks are green while growing; but the white celery seen in market has been bleached, with the exception of Kalamazoo variety, which grows white. To prepare celery for table, cut off roots and leaves, separate stalks, wash, scrape, and chill in ice-water. By adding a slice of lemon to ice-water celery is kept white and made crisp. If tops of stalks are gashed several times before putting in water, they will curl back and make celery look more attractive.

*Celery and Cabbage, Bonne Femme, December 11
Wash, scrape and cut celery in small pieces. Chill in cold or ice water, drain and dry on a towel. To celery add an equal measure of apples, pared, cored and cut in small pieces. Moisten with cream salad dressing and arrange in a salad bowl made of a small sold white cabbage, placed on a bed of crisp lettuce leaves. Cut rim of bowl in points and insert sections cut from bright red apples to fill spaces.

Celery and Cabbage Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 329
January 23
Remove outside leaves from a small solid white cabbage, and cut off stalk close to leaves. Cut out centre, and with a sharp knife shred finely. Let stand one hour in cold or ice water. Drain, wring in double cheese-cloth, to make as dry as possible. Mix with equal parts celery cut in small pieces. Moisten with Cream Dressing and refill cabbage. Arrange on a folded napkin and garnish with celery tips and parsley between folds of napkin and around top of cabbage.

Celery and Tomato Purée, A New Book of Cookery, p. 65
March 14
1 bunch celery                                 Bit of bay leaf
2 teaspoons salt                             1 teaspoon peppercorns
3 pints cold water                           2 sprigs parsley
2 tablespoons fat salt pork           1 clove garlic, crushed
1 onion, sliced                                 3 1/2 tablespoons butter
1 small carrot, sliced                     2 tablespoons flour
1 leek, sliced                                 1 pint tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon thyme                     1 tablespoon sugar
2 cloves                                         Salt and pepper
Break celery in one-inch pieces, and pound in a mortar. Add water and salt, bring slowly to the boiling point, and let simmer one hour. Try out pork fat, add vegetables and seasonings and cook ten minutes stirring constantly; then add tomatoes, sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Combine mixtures, thicken with two tablespoons flour mixed with one and one-half tablespoons butter. Cover and cook slowly one hour. Rub through a sieve, add remaining butter and serve at once.

Celery in White Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 290
January 11, April 21
Wash, scrape, and cut celery stalks in one-inch pieces; cook twenty minutes or until soft in boiling salted water; drain, and to two cups celery add one cup White Sauce I. This is a most satisfactory way of using the outer stalks of celery.

Celery Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 272
3 cups celery, cut in thin slices                          2 cups Thin White Sauce
Wash and scrape celery before cutting into pieces. Cook in boiling salted water until soft, drain, rub through a sieve, and add to sauce. Celery sauce is often made from the stock in which fowl or turkey has been boiled, or with one-half stock and one-half milk.

Celery Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 136
January 6, January 16, February 28, October 3, December 4
Celery Soup I
3 cups celery (cut in one-half               1 slice onion
     inch pieces)                                        3 tablespoons butter
1 pint boiling water                                 1/4 cup flour
2 1/2 cups milk                                        Salt and pepper
Wash and scrape celery before cutting in pieces, cook in boiling water until soft, and rub through a sieve. Scald milk with the onion, remove onion, and add milk to celery. Bind with butter and flour cooked together. Season with salt and pepper. Outer and old stalks of celery may be utilized for soups. Serve with croûtons, crisp crackers, or pulled bread.

Celery Soup II
3 stalks celery         3 tablespoons butter
3 cups milk             3 tablespoons flour
1 slice onion           Salt and pepper
                     1 cup cream
Break celery in one-inch pieces, and pound in a mortar. Cook in double boiler with onion and milk twenty minutes. Thicken with butter and flour cooked together. Season with salt and pepper, add cream, strain into tureen, and serve at once.

*Celery with Caviare, April 29
Cut thick stalks of celery in three-inch pieces. With a sharp knife, beginning at outside of stalks, make five cuts parallel to one another extending three-fourths of an inch. Make six cuts at right angles to cuts already made. Treat other end in same way. Put in iced water and let stand until cut celery curls back. Spread uncurled portion of stalks with caviare and place on a small plate with a radish cut to represent a tulip, and a small crisp lettuce-leaf.

Charlotte Russe, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 427
February 7, March 8, May 21, July 30, August 22, September 10
1/4 box gelatine or                  1/3 cup powdered sugar
1 tablespoon granulated         Whip from 3 1/2 cups thin
gelatine                                       cream
1/4 cup cold water                     1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
1/3 cup scalded cream              6 lady fingers
Soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in scalded cream, strain into a bowl, and add sugar and vanilla. Set bowl in pan of ice-water and stir constantly until it begins to thicken, then fold in whip from cream, adding one-third at a time. Should gelatine mixture become too thick, melt over hot water, and again cool before adding whip. Trim ends and sides of lady fingers, place around inside of a mould, crust side out, one-half inch apart. Turn in mixture, and chill. Serve garnished with cubes of Wine Jelly. Charlotte Russe is sometimes made in individual moulds; these are often garnished on top with some of mixture forced through a pastry bag and tube. Individual moulds are frequently lined with thin slices of sponge cake cut to fit moulds.

*Cheese and Apple Salad, November 2
Wipe and pare apples and shape with a French vegetable cutter, having twenty-four small balls; then marinate with French dressing. Mash a cream cheese and add one teaspoon, each, Worcestershire sauce and salt, and one tablespoon chopped canned pimiento. Shape into twelve balls, same size as apple balls. Arrange on lettuce leaves and garnish with strips of pimiento. Serve with French dressing.

*Cheese and Currant Salad, June 29
Mash a cream cheese and mix with finely chopped lettuce. Shape in balls, arrange on lettuce leaves, pour over French dressing, and over all Bar-le-duc currants.

Cheese Balls, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 377
June 3, October 17, October 25
1 1/2 cups grated mild cheese                     Few grains cayenne 
1 tablespoon flour                                         Whites 3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt                                          Cracker dust
Mix cheese with flour and seasonings. Beat whites of eggs until stiff, and add to first mixture. Shape in small balls, roll in cracker dust, fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper. Serve with salad course.

*Cheese Canapés, May 22
Toast circular pieces of bread and spread with French mustard; then sprinkle with a thick layer of grates cheese, seasoned with salt and cayenne. Place on tin sheet and bake until cheese has melted. Serve hot.

Cheese Croquettes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 355
February 25, October 21
3 tablespoons butter             1 cup mild cheese, cut in
1/4 cup flour                           very small cubes
2/3 cup milk                           1/2 cup grated Gruyère cheese
Yolks 2 eggs                           Salt and pepper
                      Few grains cayenne
Make a thick white sauce, using butter, flour, and milk, add yolks of eggs without first beating, and stir until well mixed; then add grated cheese. As soon as cheese melts, remove from fire, fold in cheese cubes, and season with salt, pepper, and cayenne. Spread in a shallow pan, and cool. Turn on a board, cut in small squares or strips, dip in crumbs, egg, and crumbs again, fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper. Serve for a cheese course.

*Cheese Croûtons, June 13
July 3, November 22
Cut stale bread in one-third inch slices, remove crusts, spread sparingly with butter and cut in one-third inch cubes. Put in dripping pan, sprinkle with grated soft mild cheese, and bake in a slow oven until delicately brown, stirring frequently, that cubes may brown evenly.

Cheese Fingers, What to Have for Dinner, p. 258
March 23, July 8, July 26, August 30, September 22
2 tablespoons butter                             1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup boiling water                              Few grains cayenne
1/4 cup flour                                            1 egg
1/4 cup grated cheese                           1 egg white
Put butter and water into a sauce pan and when boiling point is reached, add flour, all at one time, salt and cayenne, and stir until mixture cleaves from sides of pan. Beat in the cheese, egg unbeaten, and white of egg unbeaten. Shape mixture three inches long by one-half inch wide on a buttered sheet. Sprinkle with grated cheese and bake, fifteen minutes, in a moderate oven.

*Cheese Pudding, December 24
Cut stale bread in one-third-inch slices. Spread with butter, remove crusts, and cut in finger-shaped pieces. Arrange around sides of buttered dish, having bread about one inch above dish; also line bottom, Beat two eggs slightly, add one cup thin cream, one tablespoon butter, one teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon mustard, one-fourth teaspoon paprika, a few grains cayenne, and one-half pound mild cheese, cut in small pieces. Pour mixture in dish and bake.

*Cheese Sandwiches, October 31
March 6, March 29, May 16, June 5, August 16, December 6
Cut stale bread in one-fourth-inch slices; remove crusts and cut in rectangular pieces. Cut mild cheese in slices same size as pieces of bread and sprinkle with salt and cayenne. Put a slice of cheese between two slices of bread and sauté in butter until delicately browned on one side; then turn and brown other side.

Cheese Straws, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 475
April 2, June 21
Roll puff or plain paste one-fourth inch thick, sprinkle one-half with grated cheese to which has been added few grains of salt and cayenne. Fold, press edges firmly together, fold again, pat, and roll out one-fourth inch thick. Sprinkle with cheese and proceed as before; repeat twice. Cut in strips five inches long and one-fourth inch wide. Bake eight minutes in hot oven. Parmesan cheese, or equal parts of Parmesan and Edam cheese, may be used. Cheese straws are piled log cabin fashion and served with cheese or salad course.

Cheese Wafers, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 553
January 2, February 3, May 10, June 12, August 21
Sprinkle zephyrettes with grated cheese mixed with a few grains of cayenne. Put on a tin sheet and bake until the cheese melts.

*Cherry Moss, May 4
Soak one tablespoon granulated gelatine in one-fourth cup cold water dissolve in one-fourth cup boiling water and add one and one-half cups red canned cherries (stoned and cut in halves) and one-half cup cherry juice. When mixture begins to thicken, add whites two eggs, beaten until stiff. Mould and chill. Remove from mould to serving dish and garnish with whipped cream (sweetened and flavored with vanilla) and sprinkle with Jordan almonds (blanched, shredded and roasted).

*Cherry Salad, July 3
Wash cherries and remove stems ands stones. Fill cavities with filbert-nut meats. Arrange on a bed of crisp lettuce-leaves and garnish with cherries from which the stems have not been removed. Serve with one cup mayonnaise dressing to which has been added (just before serving time) one-third cup heavy cream beaten until stiff.

Chestnut Purée, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 292
Remove shells from chestnuts, cook until soft in boiling salted water; drain, mash, moisten with scalded milk, season with salt and pepper, and beat until light. Chestnuts are often boiled, riced, and piled lightly in centre of dish, then surrounded by meat.

Chicken à la Providence, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 246
September 6
Prepare and boil a chicken, following recipe for Boiled Fowl. The liquor should be reduced to two cups, and used for making sauce, with two tablespoons each butter and flour cooked together. Add to sauce one-half cup each of cooked carrot (cut in fancy shapes) and green peas, one teaspoon lemon juice, yolks two eggs, salt and pepper. Place chicken on hot platter, surround with sauce, and sprinkle chicken and sauce with one-half tablespoon finely chopped parsley.

*Chicken Consommé, May 10
March 8, November 8
Disjoint a four-pound fowl, and cut in pieces four pound of veal from the forequarter. Put in a kettle with one onion, two stalks celery, eight slices carrot, one teaspoon peppercorns, one-half bay leaf, four cloves, two sprigs thyme and two sprigs parsley. Cook slowly four hours, removing the fowl as soon as tender. Add salt and pepper, strain, cool and clear.

Chicken Croquettes The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 360
December 8
Chicken Croquettes I
1 3/4 cups chopped cold cooked                  1 teaspoon lemon juice
               fowl                                               Few drops onion juice
1/2 teaspoon salt                                         1 teaspoon finely chopped 
1/4 teaspoon celery salt                                             parsley
Few grains cayenne                                    1 cup Thick White Sauce
Mix ingredients in order given. Cool, shape, crumb, and fry same as other croquettes.
White meat of fowl absorbs more sauce than dark meat. This must be remembered if dark meat alone is used. Croquette mixtures should always be as soft as can be conveniently handled, when croquettes will be soft and creamy inside.

Chicken Croquettes II
Clean and dress a four-pound fowl. Put into a kettle with six cups boiling water, seven slices carrot, two slices turnip, one small onion, one stalk celery, one bay leaf, and three sprigs thyme. Cook slowly until fowl is tender. Remove fowl; strain liquor, cool, and skim off fat. Make a thick sauce, using one-fourth cup butter, one-half cup flour, one cup chicken stock, and one-third cup cream. Remove meat from chicken, chop, and moisten with sauce. Season with salt, cayenne, and slight grating of nutmeg; then add one beaten egg, cool, shape, crumb, and fry same as other croquettes. Arrange around a mound of green peas, and serve with Cream Sauce or Wine Jelly.

*Chicken en Casserole, October 1
Dress and clean a young fowl and cut in pieces for serving. Spread with one-third cup butter, put in casserole and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Pour over one cup boiling water, cover and cook until chicken is tender (about one hour). Add one cup cream and two cups fresh mushroom caps, broken in pieces. Cook ten minutes and thicken with one tablespoon flour, diluted with two tablespoons water.

Chicken Fricassee, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 248
January 10, May 3, June 21, August 23
Dress, clean, and cut up a fowl. Put in a kettle, cover with boiling water, and cook slowly until tender, adding salt to water when chicken is about half done. Remove from water, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and sauté in butter or pork fat. Arrange chicken on pieces of dry toast placed on a hot platter, having wings and sécond joints opposite each other, breast in centre of platter, and drumsticks crossed just below second joints. Pour around White or Brown Sauce. Reduce stock to two cups, strain, and remove the fat. Melt three tablespoons butter, add four tablespoons flour, and pour on gradually one and one-half cups stock. Just before serving, add one-half cup cream, and salt and pepper to taste; or make a sauce by browning butter and flour and adding two cups stock, then seasoning with salt and pepper.
Fowls, which are always made tender by long cooking, are frequently utilized in this way. If chickens are employed, they are sautéd without previous boiling, and allowed to simmer fifteen to twenty minutes in the sauce.

*Chicken Gumbo, April 19
March 20
Cook one onion, finely chopped with four tablespoons butter five minutes, stirring constantly. Add to one quart chicken stock to which have been added one-half can okra, two teaspoons salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, and one-half green pepper, finely chopped. Bring to the boiling point and let simmer forty minutes.

*Chicken Hollandaise, May 25
Cook two tablespoons butter and one teaspoon finely chopped onion five minutes, add two tablespoons cornstarch and gradually one cup chicken stock. Bring to boiling point and add one teaspoon lemon juice, one-half teaspoon salt, one-fourth-teaspoon paprika, and one and one-third cups cold cooked chicken; when well heated, add yolk of one egg slightly beaten, and cook one minute. 

Chicken Mousse, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 374
June 17
Make a chicken force-meat of one-half the breast of a raw chicken pounded and forced through a purée strainer, the white of one egg slightly beaten, one-half cup heavy cream, and salt, pepper, and cayenne to taste. Add three-fourths cup cooked white chicken meat rubbed through a sieve, the white of an egg slightly beaten, and one-half cup heavy cream beaten until stiff. Decorate a buttered mould with truffles, turn in mixture, set in pan of hot water, cover with buttered paper, and bake until firm. Remove to platter, and pour around Cream or Béchamel Sauce.

Chicken Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 344
April 22, May 11
Chicken Salad I
Cut cold boiled fowl or remnants of roast chicken in one-half inch cubes, and marinate with French Dressing. Add an equal quantity of celery, washed, scraped, cut in small pieces, chilled in cold or ice-water, drained, and dried in a towel. Just before serving moisten with Cream, Oil, or Mayonnaise Dressing. Mound on a salad dish, and garnish with yolks of “hard-boiled” eggs forced through a potato ricer, capers, and celery tips.

Chicken Salad II
Cut cold boiled fowl or remnants of roast chicken in one-half inch dice. To two cups add one and one-half cups celery cut in small pieces, and moisten with Cream Dressing II. Mound on a salad dish, cover with dressing, and garnish with capers, thin slices cut from small pickles, and curled celery.

Chicken Soufflé, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 262
May 12
2 cups scalded milk                                     2 cups cold cooked chicken, 
1/8 cup butter                                               finely chopped
1/8 cup flour                                                 Yolks 3 eggs, well beaten
1 teaspoon salt                                             1 tablespoon finely chopped 
1/8 teaspoon pepper                                   parsley
1/2 cup stale soft bread crumbs                 Whites 3 eggs, beaten stiff
Make a sauce of first five ingredients, add bread crumbs, and cook two minutes; remove from fire, add chicken, yolks of eggs, and parsley, then fold in whites of eggs. Turn in a buttered pudding-dish, and bake thirty-five minutes in a slow oven. Serve with White Mushroom Sauce. Veal may be used in place of chicken.

Chicken Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 120
January 23, January 31, May 7, May 27, June 1, September 11, October 12
6 cups White Stock III                     2 stalks celery
1 tablespoon lean raw ham,            1/2 bay leaf
finely chopped                                  1/4 teaspoons peppercorns
6 slices carrot, cut in cubes             1 sliced onion
                              1/3 cup hot boiled rice
Add seasonings to stock, heat gradually to boiling-point, and boil thirty minutes; strain, and add rice.

Chocolate Bread Pudding, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 393
December 9
2 cups stale bread crumbs                   2/3 cup sugar
4 cups scalded milk                             2 eggs
2 squares Baker’s chocolate                1/4 teaspoon salt
                                       1 teaspoon vanilla
Soak bread in milk thirty minutes; melt chocolate in saucepan placed over hot water, add one-half sugar and enough milk taken from bread and milk to make of consistency to pour; add to mixture with remaining sugar, salt, vanilla, and eggs slightly beaten; turn into buttered pudding-dish and bake one hour in a moderate oven. Serve with Hard or Cream Sauce I.

Chocolate Cake, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 506
February 13, March 6, August 18, October 18
Chocolate Cake I
1/2 cup butter             1 1/2 cups flour
1 cup sugar                 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
2 small eggs               2 ozs. chocolate, melted
1/2 cup milk               1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and yolks of eggs well beaten, then whites of eggs beaten until stiff. Add milk, flour mixed and sifted with baking powder, and beat thoroughly. Then add chocolate and vanilla. Bake forty minutes in a shallow cake pan.

Chocolate Cake II
1/2 cup butter                   1/4 teaspoon soda
1 1/2 cups sugar               3/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/2 cup milk                       Whites 5 eggs
2 1/4 cups flour                 2 squares Baker’s chocolate, grated
Cream the butter; add sugar gradually, milk, and flour mixed and sifted with soda and cream of tartar. Beat whites of eggs, and add to first mixture; then add chocolate, and beat thoroughly. Bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

Chocolate Cream, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 412
January 17
2 cups scalded milk                   1/3 cup cold milk
5 tablespoons corn-starch        1 1/2 squares Baker’s chocolate
1/2 cup sugar                                3 tablespoons hot water
1/4 teaspoon salt                          Whites 3 eggs
                             1 teaspoon vanilla 
Mix corn-starch, sugar, and salt, dilute with cold milk, add to scalded milk, and cook over hot water ten minutes, stirring constantly until thickened; melt chocolate, add hot water, stir until smooth, and add to cooked mixture; add whites of eggs beaten stiff, and vanilla. Mould, chill, and serve with cream.

*Chocolate Cream Peppermints, December 18
Mix two tablespoons hot top milk and one-half tablespoon melted butter and ad four drops oil of peppermint; then add gradually two and one-fourth cups confectioners’ (not powdered) sugar. Shape into forty balls, flatten and let stand to dry off. Dip in melted confectioners’ dipping chocolate, using a fork, and place on paraffine[sic] paper.

Chocolate Frosting, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 527
Chocolate Frosting I
1 1/2 squares chocolate                         Yolk 1 egg
1/3 cup scalded cream                           1/2 teaspoon melted butter
Few grains salt                                       Confectioners’ sugar
                               1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Melt chocolate over hot water, add cream gradually, salt, yolk of egg, and butter. Stir in confectioners’ sugar until of right consistency to spread; then add flavoring.

Chocolate Frosting II
1 3/4 cups sugar                 4 squares chocolate, melted
3/4 cup hot water               1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Boil sugar and water, without stirring, until syrup will thread when dropped from tip of spoon. Pour syrup gradually on melted chocolate, and continue beating until of right consistency to spread; then add flavoring.

Chocolate Frosting III
2 squares chocolate                 3 tablespoons hot water
1 teaspoon butter                    Confectioners’ sugar
                        1/4 teaspoon vanilla
Melt chocolate over boiling water, add butter and hot water. Cool, and add sugar to make of right consistency to spread. Flavor with vanilla.

Chocolate Ice Cream, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 444
January 11, April 26, May 24
Chocolate Ice Cream I
1 quart thin cream                    1 1/2 squares Baker’s chocolate or
1 cup sugar                                1/4 cup prepared cocoa
Few grains salt                           1 tablespoon vanilla
Melt chocolate, and dilute with hot water to pour easily, add to cream; then add sugar, salt, and flavoring, and freeze.

Chocolate Ice Cream II
Use recipe for Vanilla Ice Cream II. Melt two squares Baker’s chocolate, by placing in a small saucepan set in a larger saucepan of boiling water, and pour hot custard slowly on chocolate; then cool before adding cream.

Chocolate Marshmallow Fudge, A New Book of Cookery, p. 362
January 25
2 cups sugar                          3 tablespoons butter
1 cup top milk                        1 teaspoon vanilla
2 squares unsweetened      10 marshmallows
chocolate
Put sugar, milk and chocolate in saucepan. Heat gradually to the boiling point and let boil until mixture will form a soft ball when tried in cold water. Remove from range, add butter an as soon as butter is melted, beat until creamy. Add vanilla and fold in marshmallows, cut in quarters. Turn into a buttered pan, cool and cut in cubes.

*Chocolate Pudding, Chocolate Sauce, December 29
Bake a chocolate cake mixture in a buttered and floured angel-cake pan. Remove from pan, cool, fill centre with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored, and pour around, and serve with chocolate sauce, for which boil one cup sugar, one half-cup water, and a few grains cream-of-tartar to a thin syrup. Melt one and one-half squares chocolate and pour on gradually the hot syrup. Cool slightly, and flavor with one-fourth teaspoon vanilla.

Chocolate Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 408
January 3, March 16, November 7
2 cups milk                                           2 tablespoons hot water
1 1/2 tablespoons corn-starch          2 eggs
2 squares Baker’s chocolate              2/3 cup powdered sugar
4 tablespoons powdered sugar         1 teaspoon vanilla
Scald one and three-fourths cups milk, add corn-starch diluted with remaining milk, and cook eight minutes in double boiler; melt chocolate over hot water, add four tablespoons sugar and hot water, stir until smooth, then add to cooked mixture; beat whites of eggs until stiff, add gradually powdered sugar and continue beating, then add unbeaten yolks, and stir into cooked mixture; cook one minute, add vanilla, and cool before serving.

*Chocolate Sauce (Sautéd Pears), August 17
Chocolate sauce, for which cook two ounces sweet chocolate, one tablespoon sugar, and one and one-fourth cups milk in double boiler five minutes. Add one teaspoon arrowroot mixed with one-fourth cup cream and cook ten minutes. Melt one and one-half tablespoons butter, add one-fourth cup powdered sugar and cook until caramelized. Combine mixtures.

*Chocolate Sauce (Chocolate Pudding), December 29
Chocolate sauce, for which boil one cup sugar, one half-cup water, and a few grains cream-of-tartar to a thin syrup. Melt one and one-half squares chocolate and pour on gradually the hot syrup. Cool slightly, and flavor with one-fourth teaspoon vanilla.

*Chocolate Soufflé, June 30
September 24
Melt two tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons flour, and three-fourths cup milk. Bring to boiling-point. Melt one and one-half squares chocolate, add one-third cup sugar and two tablespoons hot water, and stir until smooth. Combine mixtures, and add yolks three eggs, beaten until thick; then add one-half teaspoon vanilla and whites three eggs beaten stiff. Turn into a buttered baking dish and bake in a moderate oven thirty minutes.

*Chocolate Sponge, March 2
May 8
Mix five tablespoons corn-starch, one-half cup sugar, and one-fourth tablespoon salt, and dilute with one-third cup cold milk. Add to two cups scalded milk, and cook over hot water ten minutes, stirring constantly until mixture thickens. Melt one and one-half squares Baker’s chocolate, add three tablespoons hot water, stir until smooth, and add to cooked mixture; then add whites of eggs beaten stiff, and one teaspoon vanilla. Mould, chill, and serve with cream.

Chocolate Walnut Wafers, A New Book of Cookery, p. 325
March 4, October 1
1/2 cup butter                           1 cup chopped walnut meats 
1 cup sugar                               1/4 teaspoon salt 
2 eggs                                        1/4 teaspoon vanilla 
2 squares unsweetened           2/3 cup flour
chocolate
Cream butter and add gradually, while beating constantly, sugar; then add eggs, well beaten, chocolate (melted), nut meats, salt, vanilla and flour. Drop from tip of spoon on a buttered sheet, one inch apart, and bake in a moderate oven.

Chow Chow, A New Book of Cookery, p. 408
November 24
Peel one quart tiny white onions and add one quart small cucumbers, two heads cauliflower, separated into flowerets, and two green peppers, thinly sliced. Cover with brine (allowing one and one-half cups salt to two quarts boiling water) and let stand over night. In the morning drain thoroughly, add fresh brine, bring to the boiling point and let simmer until vegetables are soft, then drain thoroughly. Mix six tablespoons mustard, three tablespoons flour, one tablespoon curry-powder and two-thirds cup sugar. Moisten to a smooth paste with cold vinegar, and add to two and one-half cups vinegar, brought to the boiling point. Cook, stirring constantly at first and afterward occasionally, until mixture thickens; then add drained vegetables and let simmer ten minutes. Store in glass jars.

Clam Bouillon, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 129
June 3, June 17, August 31
Wash and scrub with a brush one-half peck clams, changing the water several times. Put in kettle with three cups cold water, cover tightly, and steam until shells are well opened. Strain liquor, cool, and clear.

*Clam Chowder, August 8
May 14, August 20, September 29
Clean one quart clams with one cup water; drain, reserve liquor, heat, and strain. Chop hard part of clams; cut two-inch cube pork in small pieces and try out; add one sliced onion, fry five minutes, and strain into a stewpan. Parboil four cups potato cubes five minutes in boiling water to cover; drain, and put a layer in stewpan, add chopped clams, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and dredge with flour; add remaining potatoes, sprinkle with salt, dredge with flour, and add three cups boiling water. Cook ten minutes, add four cups milk, soft part of clams, four tablespoons butter, and clam water.

*Clam Fritters, July 22
Clean one pint clams, drain from their liquor, and chop. Beat two eggs until light, add one-third cup milk and one and one-third cups flour mixed and sifted with two teaspoons baking powder, then add chopped clams, and season highly with salt and pepper. Drop by spoonfuls, and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper, and serve at once on a folded napkin.

Clam Soup, What to Have for Dinner, p. 110
February 8, June 20, August 7
2 quarts clams (in shell)           2 crackers rolled
1 1/4 cups water                         Salt
2 tablespoons butter                 Pepper
                1 quart scalded milk
Wash clams thoroughly, scrubbing with a brush; put into kettle, add one-fourth cup water, cover closely and let steam until shells open slightly. Remove clams from shel hand separate soft from hard parts. Chop hard parts, add clam liquor, and one cup water; bring slowly to boiling point and let simmer forty-five minutes. Strain through double thickness of cheese cloth, add butter, soft part of clams, cracker dust and seasonings. Heat very hot, but do not allow mixture to reach boiling point. Turn into tureen and add milk. Serve immediately or soup will have a curdled appearance.

*Claret Sauce, April 28
Boil one cup sugar and one-fourth cup water eight minutes; cool slightly, and add one-third cup claret wine.

*Clear Mushroom Soup, August 30
April 12, November 11
Brush one-half pound mushrooms, finely chop stems, and break caps in small pieces. Add to three pints consommé, bring gradually to the boiling point, and let simmer thirty minutes. Cool and then clear, using the whites and shells of two eggs. Just before serving add Madeira wine to taste.

Club Indian Pudding, A New Book of Cookery, p. 249
June 29
1 quart scalded milk                   1 teaspoon salt
5 tablespoons granulated         3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Indian meal                                 1/2 teaspoon ginger
2 tablespoons butter                 2 eggs
1 cup molasses                          1 cup cold milk
Add meal gradually while stirring constantly, to scalded milk and cook in double boiler fifteen minutes; then add butter, molasses, seasonings and eggs, well beaten. Turn into a buttered pudding dish and pour on cold milk. Bake in a moderate oven one hour. Serve with or without vanilla ice cream.

*Cocoanut[sic] Custard, May 11
Beat five eggs slightly, add one-half cup sugar and one-fourth teaspoon salt, pour on slowly four cups scalded milk, and strain. Add one-half cup shredded cocoanut. and turn in buttered mould, set in pan of hot water. Bake in slow oven until firm, which may be readily determined by running a silver knife through custard; if knife comes out clean, custard is done. During baking, care must be taken that water surrounding mould does not reach boiling pint[sic], or custard will whey.

*Coffee Ice Cream, June 27
January 25, February 1, May 31, June 20, August 11, October 18
Scald two cups milk with one-third cup ground coffee. Mix one tablespoon flour and one cup sugar, add one egg, slightly beaten, and milk gradually Cook over hot water twenty minutes, stirring constantly at first an afterward occasionally. Cool, add one quart thin cream and strain through a double thickness of cheese-cloth, placed over a fine sieve. Freeze, using three pints finely crushed ice to one pint rock salt.

Coffee Jelly, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 419
April 11, May 27, July 27, October 10, October 17, December 2
1/2 box gelatine or                         1/2 cup cold water
2 tablespoons granulated             1 cup boiling water
gelatine                                            1/3 cup sugar
                    2 cups boiled coffee
Make same as Lemon Jelly. Serve with sugar and cream.

Coffee Soufflé, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 424
April 4, April 25, May 16, August 4, September 9
1 1/2 cups coffee infusion                 1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk                                         3 eggs
2/3 cup sugar                                     1/2 teaspoon vanilla
                    1 tablespoon granulated gelatine
Mix coffee infusion, milk, one-half of the sugar and gelatine, and heat in double boiler. Add remaining sugar, salt, and yolks of eggs slightly beaten; cook until mixture thickens, remove from range, add whites of eggs beaten until stiff and vanilla. Mould, chill, and serve with cream.

*Coffee Spanish Cream, March 24
Mix one and one-half cups coffee infusion (left from breakfast), one-half cup milk, one-third cup sugar, and one tablespoon granulated gelatine, and heat in double boiler. Beat yolks of three eggs slightly and add one-third cup sugar and one-fourth teaspoon salt. Add to first mixture and cook until mixture thickens slightly. Remove from range and add whites of three eggs, beaten until stiff, and one-half teaspoon vanilla. Mould, chill, and serve with thin cream.

*Coffee Sponge, January 24
August 15
Soak two tablespoons granulated gelatine in one-fourth cup cold water and add to two cups strong boiled coffee; then add one cup sugar. Strain into pan, set in larger pan of ice water, cool slightly, then het, using a wire whisk, until quite stiff, Add whites of three eggs, beaten until stiff, and continue the beating until the mixture will hold its shape. Turn into a mould, first dipped in cold water. Chill thoroughly, remove from mould and serve with thin cream.

*Cold Chocolate Bread Pudding, June 4
Add one up soft stale bread crumbs, one and one-half squares chocolate and one cup sugar to one and one-half cups cold milk. Cook in double boiler twelve minutes. Beat yolks three eggs until light and add one half cup milk, two tablespoons butter and one-fourth teaspoon salt. Stir into hot mixture and cook until mixture thickens, Turn in pudding dish and bake twenty minutes. Cool, cover with meringue, and bake eight minutes.

*Cold Halibut, Sauce Tyrolienne, June 19
Clean a piece of halibut weighing two and one-half pound. Steam, remove outside skin and bones, chill and mask with Sauce Tyrolienne. To three-fourths cup mayonnaise add one-half tablespoon each finely chopped capers and parsley, one finely chopped gherkin, and two tablespoons tomato purée. 

*Cold Orange Sauce, August 27
Put six tablespoons currant jelly, three tablespoons sugar, and grated rind two oranges in a bowl and beat for five minutes; then add two tablespoons orange juice, two tablespoons lemon juice, two tablespoons port wine, one-fourth teaspoon salt, and one-eighth teaspoon cayenne, and stir until well blended.

Cold Roast Beef à la Shapleigh, A New Book of Cookery, p. 116
March 9
Cold-Roast-Beef-a-la-ShapleighCut cold roast beef in thin slices and arrange slices overlapping one another, lengthwise of platter. Mix six tablespoons olive oil, two tablespoons Tarragon vinegar, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, one-half teaspoon, each, paprika and dry mustard, and one tablespoon, each, finely chopped shallot, parsley and red pepper. Pour dressing over meat and garnish with crisp lettuce leaves, stoned olives and curled celery.

*Cold Roast Lamb, Family Style, August 31
Cut cold roast lamb in slices and arrange, overlapping one another, around chop plate. In centre place individual moulds of seasoned, hot, chopped boiled spinach, seasoned with butter, salt, and pepper. Make a depression in each mould and in cavity thus made drop a poached egg. Garnish with watercress.

*Cole Slaw, February 18
February 7, November 4
Take off outside leaves from small cabbage, cut in quarters, and slice very thinly. Soak in cold water until crisp, drain, dry, and moisten with the following dressing: Mix one-half tablespoon salt, one-half tablespoon mustard, one and one-fourth tablespoon sugar, one egg slightly beaten, two and one-half tablespoons melted butter, three-fourths cup cream, and one-fourth cup vinegar. Cook over boiling water stirring constantly until mixture thickens, strain and cool.

*Commonwealth Chicken Soup, October 21
Reduce the liquor in which a fowl has been cooked to three and one-half cups. add one-half cup washed rice and cook in double boiler three hours. Just before serving add two-thirds cup heavy cream and salt and pepper to taste.

*Compote of Rice with Stewed Pears, September 7
Steam cook one-half cup rice, using half milk and half water. When kernels are soft, add three tablespoons sugar and the yolks of two eggs slightly beaten. Mound on a flat dish in conical shape and place on rice halves of stewed pears. Sprinkle all with one-fourth cup finely chopped Canton ginger.

Consommé, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 128
March 29, June 26, September 25
3 lbs. beef, poorer part of round                 2 tablespoons butter
1 lb. marrow-bone                                        1 tablespoon salt
3 lbs. knuckle of veal                                   1 teaspoon peppercorns
1 quart chicken stock                                  4 cloves
Carrot}                                                          3 sprigs thyme
Turnip} 1/3 cup each, cut in dice               1 sprig marjoram
Celery}                                                          2 sprigs parsley
1/3 cup sliced onion                                   1/2 bay leaf
                                       3 quarts cold water
Cut beef in one and one-half inch cubes, and brown one-half in some of the marrow from marrow-bone; put remaining half in kettle with cold water, add veal cut in pieces, browned meat, and bones. Let stand one-half hour. Heat slowly to boiling-point, and let simmer three hours, removing scum as it forms on top of kettle. Add one quart liquor in which a fowl was cooked, and simmer two hours. Cook carrot, turnip, onion, and celery in butter five minutes; then add to soup, with remaining seasonings. Cook one and one-half hours, strain, cool quickly, remove fat, and clear.

Consommé Dubarry, A New Book of Cookery, p. 71
June 7
5 pounds veal, cut from                                     Bit of bay leaf
fore quarter                                                         1/2 teaspoon peppercorns
2 ox-tails                                                             1 tablespoon salt
3 quarts cold water                                           1 1/2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup carrot, cut in small                               1/2 green pepper
pieces                                                                 Flowerets cooked cauliflower
1/2 cup celery, cut in small                               1/4 cup hot boiled rice
pieces                                                                 1 tablespoon shredded, blanched 
1 onion, sliced                                                     Jordan almonds
3 sprigs thyme                                                   Royal custard
Wipe veal, remove meat, cut in small pieces and put with bones in soup kettle. Add ox-tails, wiped and cut in pieces, and pour over cold water. Heat gradually to the boiling point, skim, cover, and let simmer four hours. Cook carrot, celery, onion, thyme, bay leaf, and peppercorns with butter ten minutes, stirring constantly. Add to soup and let simmer two hours; then add green pepper cut in strips and cook fifteen minutes. Strain, cool, and remove fat. Reheat and add remaining ingredients.
A consommé that does not require clearing.

Consommé Japonnaise, A New Book of Cookery, p. 74
March 22, December 6
3 pounds lean beef                10 peppercorns
3 pounds shin beef                 2 cloves
Carcass of roast chicken       5 allspice berries
1 sliced carrot                          1/4 teaspoon thyme
1 sliced onion                           1 quart cold water
1 clove garlic                             1 1/2 quarts boiling water
1 stalk celery                              Salt
1 sprig parsley                           Pepper 
Wipe meat, cut in small pieces, and put in a soup kettle. Add remaining ingredients except boiling water, salt, and pepper, cover and let stand on back of range one and one-half hours. Bring to the boiling point and let boil five minutes, stirring constantly. Add boiling water and let simmer one and one-half hours. Season with salt and pepper and strain through a piece of cheese-cloth placed over a fine strainer.

Consommé Tillyprone, A New Book of Cookery, p. 73
May 3
8 lbs. shin of beef                               2 sprigs parsley
4 lbs. knuckle of veal                         2 sprigs marjoram
2 ozs. lean raw ham                           3 sprigs thyme
4 quarts cold water                           3/4 teaspoon peppercorns
2 onions, sliced                                   4 cloves
1 small carrot                                       2 allspice berries
1/2 teaspoon celery seed                   1 inch piece stick cinnamon
Small bay leaf                                       1 tablespoon salt
Blade of mace                                       1 egg
                            3/4 cup Brussels sprouts
Wipe beef and veal, remove lean meat from bones and cut in small pieces. Put in hot iron frying pan with ham and brown (turning frequently), using just enough butter to keep meat from burning. Remove to back of range, cover and cook one hour, turning occasionally. Put in soup kettle, add water, seasonings and bones sawed in pieces. Bring quickly to boiling point, skim, simmer six hours and strain through cheese-cloth placed over a fine wire strainer, when further clearing will not be necessary. Let stand twenty-four hours. Reheat and garnish with egg, slightly beaten, run through a strainer and cooked in soup.
Wash, pick over and slice Brussels sprouts crosswise and cook in boiling salted water, to which are added a few grains soda, until soft; drain and add to soup.

*Corn Bisque Soup, November 5
Scald one quart milk with one car corn and one slice onion. Mix three tablespoon flour with one-fourth cup cold water and add to scalded milk; then cook twenty minutes, and rub through sieve. Cook one-half can tomatoes ten minutes, add one-fourth teaspoon each soda and sugar, and rub through sieve. Combine mixture and strain. Add one-third cup butter, bit by bit, and season with salt and pepper.

*Corn Chowder, December 12
Cut one and one-half inch cube salt pork in pieces and try out; add one sliced onion onion and cook five minutes. Strain fat into stewpan. Parboil four cups potatoes, cut in one-fourth-inch slices, five minutes; drain, and add potatoes to fat; then add two cups boiling water; cook until potatoes are soft, add one can corn and four cups scalded milk. Season with salt and pepper; add three tablespoons butter, and eight common crackers split and soaked in cold milk.

*Corn Croquettes, February 8
Make a thick sauce of three tablespoons butter, one-third cup flour, and one-half cup milk; add two-thirds cup drained canned corn and season with one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper and a few grains cayenne. Spread on a plate to cool. Shape, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat and drain.

Corned Beef, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 206
January 24, April 29, July 7, July 22, August 25, September 1, September 22, October 20
Corned beef has but little nutritive value. It is used to give variety to our diet in summer, when fresh meats prove too stimulating. It is eaten by the workingman to give bulk to his food. The best pieces of corned beef are the rattle rand and fancy brisket. The fancy brisket commands a higher price and may be easily told from the rattle rand by the selvage on lower side and the absence of bones. The upper end of brisket (butt end) is thick and composed mostly of lean meat, the middle cut has more fat but is not well mixed, while the lower (navel end) has a large quantity of fat. The rattle rand contains a thick lean end; the second cut contains three distinct layers of meat and fat, and is considered the best cut by those who prefer meat well streaked with fat. The rattle rand has a thin end, which contains but one layer of lean meat and much fat, consequently is not a desirable piece.
To Boil Corned Beef. Wipe the meat and tie securely in shape, if this has not been already done at market. Put in kettle, cover with cold water, and bring slowly to boiling-point. Boil five minutes, remove scum, and cook at a lower temperature until tender. Cool slightly in water in which it was cooked, remove to a dish, cover, and place on cover a weight, that meat may be well pressed. The lean meat and fat may be separated and put in alternate layers in a bread pan, then covered and pressed.

Corn Fritters, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 291
February 5, February 16, May 28, September 20, October 25
1 can corn                                 2 teaspoons salt
1 cup flour                                 1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon baking powder      2 eggs
Chop corn and add dry ingredients mixed and sifted, then add yolks of eggs, beaten until thick, and fold in whites of eggs beaten stiff. Cook in a frying-pan in fresh hot lard. Drain on paper.

Corn Oysters, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 291
March 12
Grate raw corn from cobs. To one cup pulp add one well-beaten egg, one-fourth cup flour, and season highly with salt and pepper. Drop by spoonfuls and fry in deep fat, or cook on a hot, well-greased griddle. They should be made about the size of large oysters.

Corn Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 329
May 25
Drain one can corn and season with mustard and onion juice. Marinate with French Dressing, let stand one hour, then drain. Arrange on a bed of lettuce or chiccory.

*Corn Soufflé, February 4
March 25, April 2
Melt one tablespoon butter, add two tablespoons flour and stir until well blended; then pour on one cup milk. Bring to the boiling point and add one can corn, one and one-fourth teaspoons salt, a few grains pepper, yolks two eggs, beaten until thick and lemon colored, and whites two eggs beaten until stiff and dry. Turn into a buttered dish and bake in a moderate oven thirty minutes.

Corn Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 137
January 3, April 20, September 12, October 19, November 28
1 can corn                  2 tablespoons butter
1 pint boiling water   2 tablespoons flour
1 pint milk                  1 teaspoon salt
1 slice onion               Few grains pepper
Chop the corn, add water, and simmer twenty minutes; rub through a sieve. Scald milk with onion, remove onion, and add milk to corn. Bind with butter and flour cooked together. Add salt and pepper. 

*Corn, Southern Style, December 5 (aka Corn à la Southern)
February 22, March 19, May 8
To one can chopped corn add two eggs slightly beaten, one teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, one and one-half tablespoons melted butter, and one pint scalded milk; turn into a buttered pudding-dish and bake in slow oven until firm.

*Corn Toast, June 15
Cook one-fourth tablespoon finely chopped onion with one and one-half tablespoons butter two minutes, stirring constantly. Add one cup canned corn, one pint heavy cream, one-half teaspoon salt, and one fourth teaspoon paprika. Bring to the boiling point and let simmer five minutes. Pour over six slices toasted bread (from which crusts have been removed), garnish with toast points and serve at once.

Cottage Pudding, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 395
February 28, April 2
1/4 cup butter     1 cup milk
2/3 cup sugar      2 1/4 cups flour
1 egg                     4 teaspoons baking powder
               1/2 teaspoon salt
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and egg well beaten; mix and sift flour, baking powder, and salt; add alternately with milk to first mixture; turn into buttered cake-pan; bake thirty-five minutes. Serve with Vanilla or Hard Sauce.

*Cottage Pudding, Strawberry Sauce, June 1
Bake cottage pudding mixture in angel-cake pan, remove from pan to serving dish, fill center with whipped cram, sweetened and flavored with vanilla, and pour around a strawberry sauce, for which cut strawberries in halves or quarters into a earthen bowl and set on back of range. Sprinkle with granulated sugar (the quantity depending on the sweetness of the fruit) and mash slightly. Keep warm until serving time.

*Coupe Moquin, February 10
Make a syrup by boiling four cups water and two cups sugar twenty minutes. Add two cups orange juice, one-fourth cup lemon juice, and the grated rind of two oranges. Cool, strain and freeze to a mush; then add two tablespoons Crème de Menthe cordial and continue the freezing. Serve in champagne or coupe glasses and garnish with Bar-le-duc currants.

*Crab Meat Timbales, February 24
Melt three tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour and stir until well blended; then pour on gradually while stirring constantly, three-fourth cup milk and three-fourths cup cream. Bring to the boiling point, season with three-fourths teaspoon salt and add one-half pound crab meat, one-fourth pound mushroom cups (sliced and sautéd in butter), and one canned pimiento (cut in long, thin strips). Fill Swedish timbale cases with mixture.

*Cracker Plum Pudding, Brandy Sauce, March 30
Pour four cups scalded milk over one and one-fourth cups rolled crackers and let stand until cool; add one cup sugar, four eggs beaten, one-half grated nutmeg, one teaspoon salt, and one-third cup melted butter. Parboil one and one-half cups raisins until soft by cooking in boiling water to cover; add to mixture. Turn into buttered dish and bake slowly two and one-half hours, stirring after first half-hour. Serve with brandy sauce.

*Cranberry Frappé, December 13
Cook cranberries and water eight minutes; then force through a sieve. Add sugar and lemon juice, and freeze to a mush, using equal parts of ice and salt.

Cranberry Jelly, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 572
January 4, February 9
Pick over and wash four cups cranberries. Put in a stewpan with one cup boiling water, and boil twenty minutes. Rub through a sieve, add two cups sugar, and cook five minutes. Turn into a mould or glasses.

Cranberry Moulds, What to Have for Dinner, p. 103
February 16
1 quart cranberries                    1 cup boiling water
                          2 cups sugar
Pick over and wash cranberries. Put in stew pan, add sugar and water, bring to boiling point and let boil fifteen minutes. Rub through a sieve and turn into small cordial glasses. Chill and remove from moulds.

Cranberry Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 572
Pick over and wash three cups cranberries. Put in a stewpan, add one and one-fourth cups sugar and one cup boiling water. Cover, and boil ten minutes. Care must be taken that they do not boil over. Skim and cool.

Cream Cakes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 518
1/2 cup butter                     4 eggs
1 cup boiling water            1 cup flour
Pour butter and water in saucepan and place on front of range. As soon as boiling-point is reached, add flour all at once, and stir vigorously. Remove from fire as soon as mixed, and add unbeaten eggs one at a time, beating, until thoroughly mixed, between the addition of eggs. Drop by spoonfuls on a buttered sheet, one and one-half inches apart, shaping with handle of spoon as nearly circular as possible, having mixture slightly piled in centre. Bake thirty minutes in a moderate oven. With a sharp knife make a cut in each large enough to admit of Cream Filling. This recipe makes eighteen small cream cakes. For flavoring cream filling use lemon extract. If cream cakes are removed from oven before being thoroughly cooked, they will fall. If in doubt, take one from oven, and if it does not fall, this is sufficient proof that others are cooked.

*Cream Cheese Balls, June 16
Work a ten-cent cream cheese until smooth, and add one-half tablespoon cream, six chopped pimolas, three tablespoons chopped walnut meats, one-half teaspoon salt, and a few grains paprika. Shape into balls.

Cream Dressing, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 324
July 13
Cream Dressing I
1/2 tablespoon salt                1 egg slightly beaten
1/2 tablespoon mustard        2 1/2 tablespoons melted butter
3/4 tablespoon sugar            3/4 cup cream
                            1/4 cup vinegar
Mix ingredients in order given, adding vinegar very slowly. Cook over boiling water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens, strain and cool.

Cream Dressing II
1 teaspoon mustard                         Few grains cayenne
1 teaspoon salt                                  1 teaspoon melted butter
2 teaspoons flour                                Yolk 1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons powdered sugar        1/3 cup hot vinegar
                                                  1/2 cup thick cream     
Mix dry ingredients, add butter, egg, and vinegar slowly. Cook over boiling water, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens; cool, and add to heavy cream, beaten until stiff.

Creamed Carrots, What to Have for Dinner, p. 23
March 11, April 16
Wash and scrape carrots and cut in one-third cubes; there should be two cups. Cook in boiling salted water, drain and add one cup White Sauce.

Creamed Cauliflower, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 289
January 12, February 1, August 22, October 23
Remove leaves, cut off stalk, and soak thirty minutes (head down) in cold water to cover. Cook (head up) twenty minutes or until soft in boiling salted water; drain, separate flowerets, and reheat in one and one-half cups White Sauce I.

Creamed Chicken, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 
July 6
1 1/2 cups cold cooked chicken,               1 cup White Sauce II 
cut in dice                                                    1/8 teaspoon celery salt
Heat chicken dice in sauce, to which celery salt has been added.

*Creamed Fish in Scallop Shells, July 16
September 12
Melt three tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour and one cup milk, which has been scalded with one slice onion, sprig of parsley, and bit of bay leaf. Bring to boiling point, add one and three-fourths cup flaked cold cooked halibut, and season with salt and pepper. Fill buttered scallop shells with mixture, cover wth buttered cracker crumbs, and bake until crumbs are brown.

*Creamed Mushrooms on Toast, April 27
Clean one pound mushrooms, remove caps, and cut both stems and caps in thin slices. melt five tablespoons butter, add sliced mushrooms and cook three minutes. Sprinkle with one-half teaspoon salt, and a few grains pepper, dredge with one and one-half tablespoons flour, and pour over one-half cup thin cream. Cook five minutes, stirring constantly. Serve on oblong pieces of toast and garnish with toast points and parsley.

Creamed Oysters, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 182
January 30
1 pint oysters                           1 1/2 cups White Sauce
                            1/8 teaspoon celery salt
Clean, and cook oysters until plump and edges begin to curl; drain, and add to White Sauce seasoned with celery salt. Serve on toast, in timbale cases, patty shells, or vol-au-vents. One-fourth cup sliced mushrooms are often added to Creamed Oysters.

*Creamed Oysters (Stuffed Peppers), December 30
For the oysters, wash one quart oysters and cook until plump. Drain and add to sauce made of three tablespoons butter, three and one-half tablespoons flour, one and one-half cups milk, three-fourths teaspoon salt, and a few grains pepper.

Creamed Peas, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 298
May 15, October 19, October 21, November 20, December 8
Drain Boiled Peas, and to two cups peas add three-fourths cup White Sauce II. Canned peas are often drained, rinsed, and reheated in this way.

Creamed Potatoes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 319
January 18, April 10, May 7, August 1, November 15
Put two cups cold boiled potatoes, cut in dice, in one and one-half cups White Sauce I.

*Creamed Salt Codfish, September 9
February 13, March 30, June 10, August 15, October 30
Pick salt codfish in pieces; there should be three-fourths cup. Soak in lukewarm water until soft and drain. Put in frying-pan, add two and one-half tablespoons butter and sprinkle with two tablespoons flour. Stir until well mixed and pour on gradually one cup milk. Bring to boiling point and boil two minutes. Just before sending to table add one egg, slightly beaten, and a few grains pepper.

Creamed Silver Skins, A New Book of Cookery, p. 171
Peel three cups small silver skinned onions and cook in boiling, salted water to cover, fifteen minutes. Drain, add one cup thin cream, and cook in double boiler until soft, adding three-fourths teaspoon salt the last ten minutes of the cooking.

Creamed Sweetbread, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 233
July 4
Parboil a sweetbread, and cut in one-half inch cubes, or separate in small pieces. Reheat in one cup White Sauce II. Creamed Sweetbread may be served on toast, or used as filling for patty cases or Swedish Timbales.

Creamed Sweet Potatoes, Club House Style, A New Book of Cookery, p. 191
March 10
Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes in one-half-inch cubes; there should be two cups. Put in a saucepan with two tablespoons butter and cook three minutes. Season with one-half teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon black pepper and few grains paprika; then sprinkle with two tablespoons flour and pour over one cup rich milk. Cook very slowly twenty minutes.

Cream Filling, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 524
7/8 cup sugar            2 eggs
1/3 cup flour              2 cups scalded milk
1/8 teaspoon salt      1 teaspoon vanilla or
                                     1/2 teaspoon lemon extract
Mix dry ingredients, add eggs slightly beaten, and pour on gradually scalded milk. Cook fifteen minutes in double boiler, stirring constantly until thickened, afterwards occasionally. Cool and flavor.

*Cream French Dressing, July 15
Mix one-half teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, two tablespoons lemon juice, four tablespoons olive oil, and three tablespoons heavy cream, and stir until well blended.

*Cream of Cauliflower Soup, September 15
January 22, November 14
Soak cauliflower one hour in cold water; cook in boiling salted water twenty minutes. Reserve one-half flowerets, and rub remaining cauliflower through sieve. Cook one slice onion, one stalk celery, and one-half bay leaf in one-fourth cup butter five minutes. Remove bay leaf, then add one-fourth cup flour, and stir into four cups chicken stock; add cauliflower and two cups milk. Season with salt and pepper; then strain, and add flowerets.

*Cream of Celery Soup, March 1
Chop five stalks celery and pound in a mortar. Cook in double boiler with two slices onion and four cups milk thirty minutes. Melt three tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour and cook one minute, then pour on gradually the hot milk, stirring constantly. Season with salt and pepper, add one-half cup cream, strain into tureen and serve at once.

Cream of Lima Beans, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 285
April 23
Soak one cup dried beans over night, drain, and cook in boiling salted water until soft; drain, add three-fourths cup cream, and season with butter and salt. Reheat before serving.

Cream of Lima Bean Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 136
November 17
1 cup dried lima beans                         1 cup cream or milk
3 pints cold water                                 4 tablespoons butter
2 slices onion                                       2 tablespoons flour
4 slices carrot                                       1 teaspoon salt
                              1/2 teaspoon pepper
Soak beans over night; in the morning drain and add cold water; cook until soft, and rub through a sieve. Cut vegetables in small cubes, and cook five minutes in half the butter; remove vegetables, add flour, salt, and pepper, and stir into boiling soup. Add cream, reheat, strain, and add remaining butter in small pieces.

Cream of Pea Soup,  What to Have For Dinner, p. 167
January 1, January 29, February 17, April 6, April 17, August 25, September 1, November 3, November 19
1 can peas                       2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon sugar           2 tablespoons flour
2 cups cold water          1 teaspoon salt
2 slice onion                   1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cups milk                     1/2 cup cream
                       Yolk 1 egg
Drain peas and rinse thoroughly. Add sugar, onion, and cold water and let simmer fifteen minutes. Rub though a sieve, reheat, and thicken with butter and flour cooked together. Scald milk and add to mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Add cream and yolk of egg just before serving. If a simpler soup is desired the cream and egg may be omitted.

*Cream of Spinach Soup, April 25
March 17, May 9, July 24, October 11
Cook two quarts spinach thirty minutes in three cups boiling water; drain, chop and rub through sieve; add four cups chicken stock, heat to boiling point; bind with one-fourth cup butter, and one-third cup flour cooked together and add two cups milk. Season with salt and pepper.

Cream of Tomato Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 140
June 22, August 26
1/2 can tomatoes                           1 slice onion
2 teaspoons sugar                         4 tablespoons flour
1/4 teaspoon soda                         1 teaspoon salt
1 quart milk                                     1/8 teaspoon pepper
                             1/3 cup butter
Scald milk with onion, remove onion, and thicken milk with flour diluted with cold water until thin enough to pour, being careful that the mixture is free from lumps; cook twenty minutes, stirring constantly at first. Cook tomatoes with sugar fifteen minutes, add soda, and rub through a sieve; combine mixtures, and strain into tureen over butter, salt, and pepper.

*Cream Pie, October 29
Bake three nine-inch circular pieces of pastry, and put together with cream filling. For filling, mix seven-eigths cup sugar, one-third cup flour and one-eighth teaspoons salt and pour in one and one-half cups scalded milk. Cook in double boiler, fifteen minutes. Add yolk two eggs, and cook two minutes. Cool, add one-half cup cream beaten stiff and vanilla.

Cream Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 266
May 23
Make same as Thin White Sauce, using cream instead of milk.

Cream Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 407
February 26, July 28, December 9
Cream Sauce I
3/4 cup thick cream               1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/4 cup milk                             1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Mix cream and milk, beat until stiff, using egg-beater; add sugar and vanilla.

Cream Sauce II
1 egg                                        1/2 cup thick cream               
1 cup powdered sugar          1/4 cup milk                             
                           1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Beat white of egg until stiff; add yolk of egg well beaten, and sugar gradually; dilute cream with milk, beat until stiff, combine mixtures, and flavor.

Cream Sponge Cake, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 501
June 14, July 11
Yolks 4 eggs                                             Flour
1 cup sugar                                               1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
3 tablespoons cold water                       1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons corn-starch                Whites 4 eggs
                                     1 teaspoon lemon extract
Beat yolks of eggs until thick and lemon-colored, add sugar gradually, and beat two minutes; then add water. Put corn-starch in a cup and fill cup with flour. Mix and sift corn-starch and flour with baking powder and salt, and add to first mixture. When thoroughly mixed add whites of eggs beaten until stiff, and flavoring. Bake thirty minutes in a moderate oven. This is an excellent mixture to use for whipped cream pies.

Cream Wafers, A New Book of Cookery, p. 31
February 5, March 25, October 8
Mix and sift one and one-half cups pastry flour and one teaspoon salt. Add, gradually, heavy cream to make a dough, the quantity required a scant half-cup. Toss on a slightly floured cloth and knead until smooth. Pat and roll as thin as possible. Prick with a fork and shape with a small round or fancy cutter, first dipped in flour. Arrange on a buttered sheet and bake in a moderate oven until delicately browned. Serve with salad course, or as an accompaniment to five o’clock tea.

*Creamy Sauce, July 18, 
January 6, February 16, March 11, May 20, June 22, August 19, September 29
Cream one-third cup butter, add two-thirds cup powdered sugar gradually, while beating constantly; then add very slowly two and one-half tablespoons milk and three tablespoons sherry wine. Cook over hot water, stirring constantly until mixture is thoroughly heated.

Creamy Sauce I, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 408
1/4 cup butter                       2 tablespoons milk
1/2 cup powdered sugar      2 tablespoons wine
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and milk and wine drop by drop. If liquids are added too fast the sauce will have a curdled appearance.

Crême aux Fruits, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 425
November 1
1/4 box gelatine or                                     Whites 2 eggs
1 tablespoon granulated gelatine             1/2 pint thick cream
1/4 cup cold water                                       1/3 cup milk
1/4 cup scalded milk                                   1/3 cup cooked prunes,
1/2 cup sugar                                                cut in pieces
                                1/3 cup chopped figs
Soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in scalded milk, and add sugar. Strain in pan set in ice-water, stir constantly, and when it begins to thicken add whites of eggs beaten stiff, cream (diluted with milk and beaten), prunes, and figs. Mould and chill.

Creole Soup, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 115
September 14, September 20
1 quart Brown Soup Stock                                 Salt
1 pint tomatoes                                                   Pepper
3 tablespoons chopped green                         Cayenne
peppers                                                               2 tablespoons grated
2 tablespoons chopped onion                         horseradish
1/4 cup butter                                                     1 teaspoon vinegar
1/3 cup flour                                                       1/4 cup macaroni rings
Cook pepper and onion in butter five minutes. Add flour, stock, and tomatoes, and simmer fifteen minutes. Strain, rub through sieve, and season highly with salt, pepper, and cayenne. Just before serving add horseradish, vinegar, and macaroni previously cooked and cut in rings.

Crisp Crackers, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 145
January 1, January 9, January 22, January 29, February 14, February 17, March 10, March 16, April 6, April 11, April 23, April 25, May 15, May 21, June 15, June 22, July 8, August 10, August 26, September 1, September 12, October 7, October 26, November 28, November 29
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Split common cracker and spread thinly with butter, allowing one-fourth teaspoon butter to each half cracker; put in pan and bake until delicately browned.

Croûtons (Duchess Crusts), The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 145
January 4, January 19, March 19, April 1, April 10, April 17, April 21, May 18, June 15, August 1, August 12, August 17, September 9, September 17, October 19, November 3, November 16, December 8
Cut stale bread in one-third inch slices and remove crusts. Spread thinly with butter. Cut slices in one-third inch cubes, put in pan and bake until delicately brown, or fry in deep fat.

Crown of Lamb, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 219
January 20, April 5, May 31, August 2
Crown of LambSelect parts from two loins containing ribs, scrape flesh from bone between ribs, as far as lean meat, and trim off backbone. Shape each piece in a semicircle, having ribs outside, and sew pieces together to form a crown. Trim ends of bones evenly, care being taken that they are not left too long, and wrap each bone in a thin strip of fat salt pork or insert in cubes of fat salt pork to prevent bone from burning; then cover with buttered paper. Roast one and one-fourth hours.
Remove pork from bones before serving, and fill centre with Purée of Chestnuts.

Cucumber Boats, What to Have for Dinner, p. 254
September 12, October 22
Select three long, regular shaped cucumbers, cut a thin slice from both the stem and blossom end of each, and cut in halves crosswise. Remove pulp, and seeds, if possible, in sufficiently large pieces to cut in cubes for another salad. Cut sections so as to make boat shape. Arrange each boat on a single lettuce leaf, and fill with Sauce Tartare.

*Cucumber Cups, July 24
August 15, September 22
Pare cucumbers and remove a thick slice from each end and with a sharp pointed knife make eight grooves at equal distances lengthwise of cucumber. Cut in pieces crosswise and remove some of the inside, leaving cups; then cut in thin slices crosswise, keeping the original shapes. Arrange on nest of lettuce leaves and fill with cream French dressing.

*Cucumber Jelly Salad, August 23
Peel four cucumbers and cut in thin slices. Cover with one cup cold water, bring to boiling point, and cook until soft; then force through a purée stainer. Add two and one-half tablespoons granulated gelatine[sic] dissolved in three-fourths cup boiling water, few drops onion juice, one tablespoon vinegar, few grains cayenne, salt and pepper to taste. Strain through cheese-cloth into mould and chill. Serve on lettuce with tomato mayonnaise.

Cucumber Ribbons, What to Have for Dinner, p. 147
August 12, November 8
Cut a thick slice from both ends of cucumbers and pare; then cut in one-fourth inch slices. Cut slices round and round to form ribbons, using a small, sharp knife. Plunge into cold water and let stand one-half hour. Drain and pour over French Dressing.

Cucumber Salad, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 328
July 19, July 29, August 2, August 5, August 11, October 9
Remove thick slices from both ends of a cucumber, cut off a thick paring, and with a sharp-pointed knife cut five parallel grooves lengthwise of cucumber at equal distances; then cut in thin parallel slices crosswise, keeping cucumber in its original shape. Arrange on lettuce leaves, and pour over Parisian French Dressing. Serve with fish course.

*Cucumber Sauce, July 10
June 1, August 21
Wipe, pare, grate, and drain two cucumbers. Season with salt, pepper, and vinegar.

Cup Cakes, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 510
April 18, July 17, July 26, October 25
2/3 cup butter                     1 cup milk
2 cups sugar                       3 1/4 cups flour
4 eggs                                 4 teaspoons baking powder
                  1/4 teaspoon mace
Put butter and sugar in a bowl, and stir until well mixed; add eggs well beaten, then milk, and flour mixed and sifted with baking powder and mace. Bake in individual tins. Cover with Chocolate Frosting.

Cup St. Jacques, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 435
December 1
Serve Lemon Ice in champagne glasses. Put three-fourths teaspoon Maraschino in each glass, and garnish with bananas cut in one-fourth inch slices, and slices cut in quarters, candied cherries cut in halves, Malaga grapes from which skins and seeds have been removed, and angelica cut in strips.

Currant Cake, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 509
October 11
1/2 cup butter                     1/2 cup milk
1 cup sugar                         2 cups flour
2 eggs                                 3 teaspoons baking powder
Yolk 1 egg                           1 cup currants mixed with
                   1 tablespoon flour
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and eggs and egg yolk well beaten. Then add milk, flour mixed and sifted with baking powder, and currants. Bake forty minutes in buttered and floured cake pan.

Currant Jelly, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 574
May 31, July 27, August 30, September 13, October 27, November 11, November 18, December 7
Currants are in the best condition for making jelly between June twenty-eighth and July third, and should not be picked directly after a rain. Cherry currants make the best jelly. Equal proportions of red and white currants are considered desirable, and make a lighter colored jelly.
Pick over currants, but do not remove stems; wash and drain. Mash a few in the bottom of a preserving kettle, using a wooden potato masher; so continue until berries are used. Cook slowly until currants look white. Strain through a course strainer, then allow juice to drop through a double thickness of cheese-cloth or a jelly bag. Measure, bring to boiling-point, and boil five minutes; add unequal measure of heated sugar, boil three minutes, skim, and pour into glasses. Place in a sunny window, and let stand twenty-four hours. Cover, and keep in a cool, dry place.

*Currant Jelly Sauce, March 29
March 1
To two cups brown gravy made to serve with roast lamb add one-half tumbler currant jelly and two tablespoons sherry wine.

*Currant Jelly Sauce (Baked Bananas), January 31
Beat one-half cup currant jelly and dissolve in two-thirds cup boiling water. Thicken with one teaspoon arrowroot diluted with two tablespoons cold water; then add one tablespoon butter and one teaspoon lemon juice.

Currant Mint Sauce, The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 219
January 20, November 19
Separate two-thirds tumbler of currant jelly in pieces, but do not beat it. Add one and one-half tablespoons finely chopped mint leaves and shavings from the rind of one-fourth orange.

Currant Pie The Boston Cookery-School Cookbook, p. 468
June 24, July 15
1 cup currants                   1/4 cup flour
1 cup sugar                       2 egg yolks
                     2 tablespoons water
Mix flour and sugar, add yolks of eggs slightly beaten and diluted with water. Wash currants, drain, remove stems, then measure; add to first mixture and bake in one crust; cool, and cover with Meringue I. Cook in slow oven until delicately browned.

*Curried Apples, December 20
Wipe, pare, and core six sour apples and arrange in a baking dish. Mix one-half cup brown sugar, one tablespoon curry powder, and one tablespoon melted butter. Fill cavities with mixture, pour three-fourths cup chicken stck in dish and bake until apples are soft, basting every six minutes.

*Curried Vegetables, February 9
May 21
Cook one cup each potato and carrot dice in boiling salted water until soft. Drain, add one cup peas and curry sauce. Sprinkle with one-half tablespoon finely chopped parsley. For the curry sauce, cook two tablespoons butter and one-half onion, sliced,  five minutes, until yellow, add two tablespoons flour mixed with three-fourths teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon curry powder, and one-fourth teaspoon pepper, and pour on one cup scalded milk. Bring to the boiling point, strain and add vegetables.

Curry Dressing, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, p. 324
March 13, May 1
3/4 teaspoon salt                           1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon curry powder           5 tablespoons olive oil
                            3 tablespoons vinegar
Mix ingredients in order given and stir until well blended.

Custard Sauce, What to Have for Dinner, p. 11
February 12, February 24, February 27, April 3, April 24, August 1, September 13, November 18
1 1/2 cups scalded milk                    3 tablespoons sugar
Yolks 3 eggs                                      Few grains salt
                            1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Beat egg yolks slightly, add sugar and salt; then add hot milk, gradually, while stirring constantly. Cook in double boiler until mixture thickens, stirring constantly at first and afterwards occasionally. Strain, chill and flavor.

*Custard Soufflé, February 14
May 20, June 16, June 22
Melt three tablespoons butter, add one-fourth cup flour, and gradually one cup scalded hot milk. Bring to boiling point and pour on to four yolks of eggs beaten until thick and lemon colored, and mixed with one-fourth cup sugar; then cut and fold in whites of four eggs beaten stiff and dry. Turn into buttered pudding dish, and bake from thirty to thirty-five minutes in slow oven. Serve immediately.