Sabayon Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 409
February 14
Grated rind and juice 1/2 lemon      1/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup white wine or                        2 eggs
1/4 cup Sherry
Mix lemon, wine, sugar, and yolks of eggs; stir vigorously over fire until it thickens, using a wire whisk; pour on to whites of eggs beaten stiff.

St. Germain Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 122
February 19
3 cups White Stock I, II, or III         Blade of mace
1 can Marrowfat peas                     2 teaspoons sugar
1 cup cold water                              1 teaspoon salt
1/2 onion                                           1/8 teaspoon pepper
Bit of bay leaf                                   2 tablespoons butter
Sprig of parsley                                2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup milk
Drain and rinse peas, reserving one-third cup; put remainder in cold water with seasonings, and simmer one-half hour; rub through sieve and add stock. Bind with butter and cornstarch cooked together; boil five minutes. Add milk and reserved peas.

*Salad Rolls, April 22
May 11, June 22
Scald one and one-half cups milk, add one-fourth cup sugar, one-half cup butter, and one-half teaspoon salt; when lukewarm add one-half yeast cake, and when yeast cake is dissolves, four cups of flour. Mix thoroughly and add whites of two eggs beaten until stiff. Cover and let rise turn into buttered iron gem pans, having pans one-half full of mixture. Let rise, and bake in a hot oven twenty minutes.

*Sally’s Bread Pudding, April 10
Pour one quart scalded milk over two cups stale bread crumbs, cover and let stand fifteen minutes. Add yolks four eggs, well beaten, to tablespoons melted butter, few gratings nutmeg, and one-fourth teaspoon soda dissolved in two teaspoons hot water; then fold in whites four eggs, beaten until stiff. Turn into a buttered pudding dish and bake in a moderate oven forty-five minutes.

Salmon Box, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 177
May 15
Line a bread pan, slightly buttered, with warm steamed rice. Fill the centre with cold boiled salmon, flaked, and seasoned with salt, pepper, and a slight grating of nutmeg. Cover with rice and steam one hour. Turn on a hot platter for serving, and pour around Egg Sauce II.

Salmon Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 341
April 30
Flake remnants of cold boiled salmon. Mix with French Mayonnaise, or Cream Dressing. Arrange on nests of lettuce leaves. Garnish with the yolk of a “hard-boiled” egg forced through a potato ricer, and white of egg cut in strips.

Salmon Timbales, What to Have for Dinner, p. 164
July 18
3/4 cup soft bread crumbs         Few grains cayenne
1 cup milk                                       1 1/2 cups flaked canned
1/2 teaspoon salt                             salmon
Whites 3 eggs
Remove salmon< from can, rince thoroughly with hot water and separate in small flakes. Soak bread crumbs in milk fifteen minutes, then cook over hot water and stir to form a smooth paste. Add salt, cayenne and salmon. Cut and fold in whites of eggs, beaten until stiff. Turn into slightly buttered mould set in pan of hot water, cover with buttered paper, and bake until firm; the time required being about fifty minutes: Serve with French Hollandaise Sauce.

Salted Almonds, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 535
January 25, March 8, March 22
Salted Almonds I
Blanch one-fourth pound Jordan almonds and dry on a towel. Put one-third cup olive oil in a very small saucepan. When hot, put in one-fourth of the almonds and fry until delicately browned, stirring to keep almonds constantly in motion. Remove with a spoon or small skimmer, taking up as little oil as possible. Drain on brown paper and sprinkle with salt; repeat until all are fried. It may be necessary to remove some of the salt by wiping nuts with a napkin.

Salted Almonds II
Prepare almonds as for Salted Almonds I. Fry in one-third cup fat, using half lard and half clarified butter or all cocoanut butter. Drain, and sprinkle with salt.

*Sardine Cocktails, March 15
Skin and bone one small box sardines and separate into small pieces. Mix one-half cup tomato catsup, two teaspoons Worcestershire sauce, one-half teaspoon tabasco sauce and juice one lemon, add sardines and season with salt. Chill thoroughly and serve in scallop shells on a plate of crushed ice.

Sauce Figaro, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 275
June 13
To Hollandaise Sauce II add two tablespoons tomato purée (tomatoes stewed, strained, and cooked until reduced to a thick pulp), one teaspoon finely chopped parsley, and a few grains cayenne.

*Sauce Tartare, September 12
January 14, March 20
Mix one-half teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon powdered sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, and few grains cayenne; add yolks two eggs, setting bowl in pan ice water. Add one-half cup olive oil, at first drop by drop, As mixture thickens, dilute with one and one-half tablespoons vinegar, when oil may be added more rapidly; then add one-half tablespoon each, finely chopped, capers, pickles, olives, parsley and one-half shallot, finely chopped, and one-fourth teaspoon powdered tarragon.

Sautéd Bananas, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 571
March 2, April 4
Remove skins from bananas, cut in halves lengthwise, and again cut in halves crosswise. Dredge with flour, and sauté in clarified butter. Drain, and sprinkle with powdered sugar.

*Sautéd Lamb Fillets, April 16
Order two pounds lamb from fore-quarter. Wipe, remove bone, and cut meat in strips one inch in thickness; then flatten with a cleaver to three-fourths inch in thickness. Arrange on platter and pour over a marinade made by mixing three tablespoons olive oil, three tablespoons vinegar, two-thirds teaspoon salt, one-half onion, finely chopped, and one teaspoon chopped parsley. Cover, and let stand over night. Remove, and sauté meat in butter.

*Sautéd Pears, Chocolate Sauce, August 17
Pare four Bartlett pears, cut in fourths, and sauté in butter. Pour over chocolate sauce, for which cook two ounces sweet chocolate, one tablespoon sugar, and one and one-fourth cups milk in double boiler five minutes. Add one teaspoon arrowroot mixed with one-fourth cup cream and cook ten minutes. Melt one and one-half tablespoons butter, add one-fourth cup powdered sugar and cook until caramelized. Combine mixtures.

*Sautéd Potatoes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 320
June 6
Cut cold boiled potatoes in one-fourth inch slices, season with salt and pepper, put in a hot, well-greased frying-pan, brown on one side, turn and brown on other side.

Sautéd Quail à la Moquin, A New Book of Cookery, p. 148
January 20
Dress, clean and truss six quail. Put in a copper saucepan one-half cup butter, two finely chopped shallots, two cloves garlic, finely chopped, one-half bay leaf, one teaspoon peppercorns and two cloves, and cook, stirring constantly, eight minutes. Sauté quail in mixture until well browned. Pour over one pint white wine and let simmer thirty minutes. Remove quail, strain sauce into casserole an add one pint heavy cream. Season with one-half teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, a few grains cayenne and one teaspoon finely cut chives. Put quail in casserole, cover and heat to the boiling point. Serve in casserole.

*Sautéd Tripe, December 23
Cut honeycomb tripe in pieces for serving and parboil eight minutes, using equal parts milk and water. Drain, sprinkle with salt and pepper, roll in flour, and sauté in butter in a hot iron frying-pan. Remove to hot platter and garnish with lemon slices and parsley.

Sauterne Jelly, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 420
Soak two tablespoons granulated gelatine in one-half cup cold water, and dissolve in one and one-half cups boiling water. Add one and one-half cups Sauterne, three tablespoons lemon juice, and one cup sugar. Color with leaf green, strain into a shallow pan, chill, and cut in inch cubes.

Savory Potatoes, A New Book of Cookery, p. 182
February 10, March 4, March 15, April 27, June 4, June 7, June 21, July 21
Force hot boiled potatoes through a potato ricer; there should be two cups. Season with three tablespoons butter, one and one-half teaspoons salt, and moisten with one-third cup milk or cream. Beat vigorously and add one tablespoon chopped watercress and one teaspoon chopped fresh mint leaves.

Scallop Cocktail, A New Book of Cookery, p. 81
March 9
Scallop Cocktail I
Scallop-CocktailClean scallops, put in saucepan and cook until they begin to shrivel. Drain, chill and put in small fluted shells, allowing five for each shell. Arrange two shells on each plate of finely crushed ice, placing between shells a small glass containing cocktail dressing, same as used for Oyster Cocktail.

Scallop Cocktail II
1 teaspoon salt                                     1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon pepper                           2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon chopped parsley               8 tablespoons Tomato
1 teaspoon chives, finely cut               Catsup
1/2 teaspoon chopped shallot              1 teaspoon grated horse-
1/2 teaspoon olive oil                               radish root
10 drops Tabasco Sauce                           1 pint scallops
1 1/2 teaspoons Worcester-
shire Sauce
Mix ingredients, except scallops. Cook scallops five minutes, drain, chill thoroughly, and cut in halves. Add to sauce and serve in cocktail glasses. This recipe makes six cocktails.

*Scalloped Macaroni with Onions, October 12
Cook one cup macaroni broken into one-inch pieces in boiling water until soft and drain. Peel twelve silver skinned onions, prick each several times and cook in boiling water until soft. Put layer of macaroni in buttered dish, arrange over macaroni one-half the onions and sprinkle with one-third cup grated cheese and pour over one cup white sauce; repeat. Cover top with buttered crumbs and bake.

Scotch Broth, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 221
May 20
Wipe three pounds mutton cut from fore-quarter. Cut lean meat in one-inch cubes, put in kettle, cover with three pints cold water, bring quickly to boiling-point, skim, and add one-half cup barley which has been soaked in cold water over night; simmer one and one-half hours, or until meat is tender. Put bones in a second kettle, cover with cold water, heat slowly to boiling-point, skim, and boil one and one-half hours. Strain water from bones and add to meat. Fry five minutes in two tablespoons butter, one-fourth cup each of carrot, turnip, onion, and celery, cut in one-half inch dice, add to soup with salt and pepper to taste, and cook until vegetables are soft. Thicken with two tablespoons each of butter and flour cooked together. Add one-half tablespoon finely chopped parsley just before serving. Rice may be used in place of barley.

*Scrub Potatoes, October 5
May 14, July 4, July 27
Force hot boiled potatoes through a potato ricer; there should be three and one-half cups. Season with three tablespoons butter, one and one-half teaspoons salt, and one-fourth teaspoon pepper. Add two-thirds cup hot milk and beat vigorously. Turn into buttered dish, pour over one-half cup heavy cream and sprinkle with three-fourths cup coarse stale bread crumbs. Bake until crumbs are brown.

Shad à la Delmonico, What to Have for Dinner, p. 147
April 12
Split fish, clean, and place in a buttered dripping pan. Season with salt and pepper, sprinkle with two shallots, finely chopped, and pour over one-half cup white wine. Cover with buttered paper and bake twenty-five minutes. Remove to hot serving dish and pour around.

Shadow Potatoes (Saratoga Chips), The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 314
January 31, May 4, July 24
Wash and pare potatoes. Slice thinly (using vegetable slicer) into a bowl of cold water. Let stand two hours, changing water twice. Drain, plunge in a kettle of boiling water, and boil one minute. Drain again, and cover with cold water. Take from water and dry between towels. Fry in deep fat until light brown, keeping in motion with a skimmer. Drain on brown paper and sprinkle with salt.

*Shapleigh Timbales, October 15
Wash calf’s brains and cook in boiling, salted, acidulated water, to which has been added one slice, each onion and carrot. Drain and when cold cut into cubes, pour over one-half cup sherry wine, and let stand one hour. Peel one-fourth pound mushroom capes, slice, and sauté in butter. Melt three tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour and add one cup thin cream and one-half cup heavy cream. Bring to boiling point, add brains and mushroom caps and season with salt, paprika and cayenne.

Shell Beans, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 285
June 29, July 23, July 29, August 5, August 28, September 7
Wash, and cook in boiling water from one to one and a half hours, adding salt last half-hour of cooking. Cook in sufficiently small quantity of water, that there may be none left to drain off when beans are cooked. Season with butter and salt.

Sherry Sauce, A New Book of Cookery, p. 260
January 15, March 3, April 20, June 9, August 10
Sherry Sauce I
Mix thoroughly one-half cup sugar and one tablespoon cornstarch; then pour on gradually, while stirring constantly, one cup boiling water. Bring to the boiling point and let simmer three minutes. remove from range, add a few grains salt, two tablespoons butter, bit by bit, and one tablespoon Sherry wine.

Sherry Sauce II
Whites 2 eggs                                1 tablespoon apricot
2/3 cups powdered sugar             marmalade
1/4 cup Sherry wine
Beat whites of eggs until stiff. Add sugar gradually, continuing the beating, then add marmalade and Sherry wine.

Shredded Potatoes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 314
January 14, January 23, February 20, August 3
Wash, pare and cut potatoes in one-eighth inch slices. Cut slices in one-eighth inch strips. Soak one hour in cold water. Take from water, dry between towels, and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper and sprinkle with salt. Serve around fried or baked fish.

*Shrimp Sauce, July 31
Melt three tablespoons butter butter, add three tablespoons flour and stir until well blended; then pour on gradually, while stirring constantly, one and one-half cups hot water. Bring to the boiling point and let boil five minutes. Add three-fourths teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, one egg yolk slightly beaten, and three-fourths cup shrimps cleaned and cut in pieces.

Sliced Tomatoes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 302
August 10
Wipe, and cover with boiling water; let stand one minute, when they may be easily skinned. Chill thoroughly, and cut in one-third inch slices.

*Smoked Fish Canapés, December 22
Cut stale bread in one-fourth-inch slices, remove crusts and cut in oblongs four by three inches; then sauté in olive oil until delicately browned. Arrange on each, lengthwise, alternate pieces of thinly sliced smoked salmon and smoked herring, using two of each. Pipe around each a border of butter worked until creamy and seasoned with anchovy and lemon juice.

Smothered Cabbage, A New Book of Cookery, p. 163
January 24
Take off outside wilted leaves from a firm medium-sized cabbage, cut in quarters and remove tough centre portion; then finely chop or force through a meat chopper; there should be five cups. Melt five tablespoons butter in hot iron frying pan, add two tablespoons flour and stir until well blended; then pour in gradually, while stirring constantly, one cup milk. Bring to the boiling point and add two teaspoons salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, and cabbage. Mix thoroughly, cover, put on bakc of range and cook slowly from fifty to sixty minutes.

*Smothered Round Steak, February 12
Try out three slices fat salt pork, add one sliced onion, and cook until onion is brown. Add two-pound slice round steak, sear on one side, turn and sear on other side. Pour over one and one-half cups cold water, bring to boiling point, add one-fourth teaspoon salt, cover closely, remove to back of range, and let simmer until meat is tender. Remove steak and strain stock; there should be one cup, of which make gravy.

Snow Pudding, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 422
February 12, February 24, April 3, August 1
Snow Pudding I
1/4 box gelatine or                                          1 cup boiling water
1 tablespoon granulated gelatine                  1 cup sugar
1/4 cup cold water                                           1/4 cup lemon juice
Whites 3 eggs
Soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in boiling water, add sugar and lemon juice, strain, and set aside in cool place; occasionally stir mixture, and when quite thick, beat with wire spoon or whisk until frothy; add whites of eggs beaten stiff, and continue beating until stiff enough to hold its shape. Mould, or pile by spoonfuls on glass dish; serve cold with Boiled Custard. A very attractive dish may be prepared by coloring half the mixture with fruit red.

Snow Pudding II
Beat whites of four eggs until stiff, add one-half tablespoon granulated gelatine dissolved in three tablespoons boiling water, beat until thoroughly mixed, add one-fourth cup powdered sugar, and flavor with one-half teaspoon lemon extract. Pile lightly on dish, serve with Boiled Custard.

Soft-shell Crabs, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 174
July 24
Clean crabs, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in crumbs, egg, and crumbs, fry in deep fat, and drain. Being light, they will rise to top of fat, and should be turned while frying. Soft-shell crabs are usually fried. Serve with Sauce Tartare.
To Clean a Crab. Lift and fold back the tapering points which are found on each side of the back shell, and remove spongy substance that lies under them. Turn crab on its back, and with a pointed knife remove the small piece at lower part of shell, which terminates in a point; this is called the apron.

*Somerset Smelts, March 6
Clean six selected smelts and cut five diagonal parallel gashes on each side. Season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice, and let stand ten minutes. Roll in cream, dip in flour, and sauté in butter. Add to butter remaining in pan two tablespoons flour, one cup chicken stock, one and one-third teaspoons anchovy essence, and a few drops lemon juice. Just before sauce is poured around smelts, add one and one-half tablespoons butter, and one teaspoon chopped parsley.

Soubise Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 267
2 cups sliced onions            1/2 cup cream or milk
1 cup Velouté Sauce              Salt and pepper
Cover onions with boiling water, cook five minutes, drain, again cover with boiling water, and cook until soft; drain, and rub through a sieve. Add to sauce with cream. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with mutton, pork chops, or “hard boiled” eggs.

Soubrics of Spinach, A New Book of Cookery, p. 176
March 26
Wash, boil, and drain two quarts spinach; then chop. Add two tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese and two egg yolks, slightly beaten, and season with one-half teaspoon salt and a few grains, each, cayenne and nutmeg. Cook five minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from range and stir in the unbeaten white of one egg. Measure by rounding tablespoonfuls, sauté in butter, arrange on hot serving dish and pour around one cup white sauce.

*Souffléd Crackers, December 4
January 7, January 31, February 7, March 17, March 29, April 8, April 12
Split common crackers, and soak in ice water to cover eight minutes. Drain, arrange in dripping pan, and put one-third teaspoon butter in the center of each. Bake in a hot oven until puffed and browned, the time required being about forty-five minutes. Used as an accompaniment to the five o’clock cup of tea as well as soup.

Soufflé of Tomatoes, Neapolitan Style, A New Book of Cookery, p. 179
January 16
Melt two tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons flour, and str until well blended; then pour on gradually, while stirring constantly, one-half cup rich milk and one cup tomato purée. Bring to the boiling point and let simmer two minutes; then add two-thirds cup grated Parmesan cheese, one-half teaspoon salt, and a few grains pepper. Break macaroni in one-half-inch pieces (there should be one-half cup) and cook in boiling, salted water until soft; drain and add one and one-half tablespoons melted butter. Add to tomato mixture; then add the yolks of three eggs, beaten until thick and lemon colored, and cut and fold in the whites of three eggs, beaten until stiff. Turn into a buttered baking dish and bake until firm. Serve immediately.
To obtain tomato purée, simmer one can tomatoes until reduced one-half, then force through a purée strainer and again let simmer until reduced to one cup.

Southdown Soup, A New Book of Cookery, p. 67
March 10, April 26
Fore quarter lamb                         1/2 tablespoon salt
3 quarts cold water                       1/3 cup string beans
1 onion                                             1/3 cup boiled rice
1/2 teaspoon peppercorns            1/4 teaspoon celery salt
Wipe lamb, discarding skin and fat, and cut lean meat in small pieces. Put in kettle with bones and add cold water. Cover, bring gradually to the boiling point and let simmer four hours. During the last hour of the cooking add sliced onion, peppercorns, and salt. Strain, chill, and remove fat. Heat to the boiling point and to each quart of the stock add beans, cut on the diagonal, in small pieces, rice, and celery salt.

Spanish Cream, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 423
February 3, May 12, August 21, December 16
1/4 box gelatine or                Yolk 3 eggs
1 tablespoon granulated       1/2 cup sugar (scant)
gelatine                                     1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups milk                               1 teaspoon vanilla or
Whites 3 eggs                           3 tablespoons wine
Scald milk with gelatine, add sugar, pour slowly on yolks of eggs slightly beaten. Return to double boiler and cook until thickened, stirring constantly; remove from range, add salt, flavoring, and whites of eggs beaten stiff. Turn into individual moulds, first dipped in cold water, and chill; serve with cream. More gelatine will be required if large moulds are used.

*Spanish Dressing, December 21
Mix three-fourths teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, two tablespoons vinegar, four tablespoons oil, and two tablespoons chili sauce. Stir until well blended. Tomato catsup may be used in place of chili sauce.

*Spanish Potato Croquettes, July 12
Force hot boiled potatoes through a potato ricer; there should be two cups. Add two tablespoons butter, yolks to eggs, slightly beaten, and two tablespoons pimiento purée. Season with salt and pepper. Shape, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper.

Spanish Potatoes, A New Book of Cookery, p. 182
February 11
Season three cups hot riced potatoes with three tablespoons butter, one-half cup cream, and salt to taste. Beat vigorously five minutes, add one and one-half canned pimientos (cut in small pieces or forced through a purée strainer) and beat until well blended. Re-heat and pile on a hot serving plate.

*Spiced Cranberry Jelly, March 22
Pick over and wash one quart cranberries. Add one cup boiling water and let boil until cranberries are soft. Rub through a sieve and add two cups sugar, one-third cup cold water, two-thirds inch piece stick cinnamon, twenty-four whole cloves, and six allspice berries. Again bring to boiling point and let simmer fifteen minutes. Add a few grains salt, turn into a mould and chill.

Spinach à la Béchamel, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 300
February 4, May 4
Prepare one-half peck Boiled Spinach. Put three tablespoons butter in hot omelet pan; when melted, add chopped spinach, cook three minutes. Sprinkle with two tablespoons flour, stir thoroughly, and add gradually three-fourths cup milk; cook five minutes.

Spinach Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 335
May 5
Pick over, wash, and cook one-half peck spinach. Drain, and chop finely. Season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice, and add one tablespoon melted butter. Butter slightly small tin moulds and pack solidly with mixture. Chill, remove from moulds, and arrange on thin slices of cold boiled tongue cut in circular pieces. Garnish base of each with a wreath of parsley, and serve on top of each Sauce Tartare.

Spinach Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 123
June 13
4 cups White Stock II or III                 1/4 cup butter
2 quarts spinach                                 1/3 cup flour
3 cups boiling water                           Salt
2 cups milk                                          Pepper
Wash, pick over, and cook spinach thirty minutes in boiling water to which has been added one-fourth teaspoon powdered sugar and one-eighth teaspoon of soda; drain, chop, and rub through sieve; add stock, heat to boiling-point, bind, add milk, and season with salt and pepper

Sponge Cake, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 502
February 22, April 5, May 28, August 17, August 27
Yolks 6 eggs                             Grated rind one-half lemon
1 cup sugar                               Whites 6 eggs
1 tablespoon lemon juice         1 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
Beat yolks until thick and lemon-colored, add sugar gradually, and continue beating, using Dover egg-beater. Add lemon juice, rind, and whites of eggs beaten until stiff and dry. When whites are partially mixed with yolks, remove beater, and carefully cut and fold in flour mixed and sifted with salt. Bake one hour in a slow oven, in an angel cake pan or deep narrow pan.
Genuine sponge cake contains no rising properties, but is made light by the quantity of air beaten into both yolks and whites of eggs, and the expansion of that air in baking. It requires a slow oven. All so-called sponge cakes which have the addition of soda and cream of tartar or baking powder require same oven temperature as butter cakes. When failures are made in Sunshine and Angel Cake, they are usually traced to baking in too slow an oven, and removing from oven before thoroughly cooked.

Sponge Drops, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 504
March 10
Drop Lady Finger mixture from tip of spoon on unbuttered paper. Sprinkle with powdered sugar, and bake eight minutes in a moderate oven.

*Squash Pudding, February 6
Mix one-half cup sugar, one and one-fourth teaspoons salt, and one teaspoon cinnamon, and add two and one-fourth cups steamed and strained squash, the yolks of two eggs slightly beaten and two and one-fourth cups hot milk; then add whites of two eggs, beaten until stiff. Turn into a buttered pudding dish and bake in a moderate oven until firm. Cool before serving.

*Steamed Apple Pudding, Vanilla Sauce, October 30
April 27, May 26, July 16, August 5, August 28
Mix and sift two cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt; work in two tablespoons butter, and add three-fourths cup milk; toss on floured board, pat and roll out, place four apples pared, cored and cut in eighths on middle of dough, and sprinkle with one tablespoon sugar mixed with one-fourth teaspoon, each, salt and nutmeg; bring dough around apples and lift into buttered mould. Steam one hour and one-half hours. Serve with vanilla sauce.

*Steamed Blueberry Pudding, August 7
July 18, August 19
Mix and sift two cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt. Work in two tablespoons butter, using tips of fingers, and add gradually, one cup milk; then add one cup blueberries dredge in one and one-half tablespoon flour. Turn into a buttered mould, adjust buttered cover , and steam one and one-half hour.

Steamed Clams, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 185
July 1, July 6, August 27
Clams for steaming should be bought in the shell and always be alive. Wash clams thoroughly, scrubbing with a brush, changing the water several times. Put into a large kettle, allowing one-half cup hot water to four quarts clams; cover closely, and steam until shells partially open, care being taken that they are not overdone. Serve with individual dishes of melted butter. Some prefer a few drops of lemon juice or vinegar added to the butter. If a small quantity of boiling water is put into the dishes, the melted butter will float on top and remain hot much longer.

*Steamed Cranberry Pudding, November 10
January 6
Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup sugar gradually, and three eggs well beaten. Mix and sift three and one-half cups flour and one and one-fourth tablespoons baking powder and add alternately with one-half cup milk to first mixture. Stir in one and one-half cups cranberries, turn into buttered mould, cover, and steam three hours. Serve with thin cream, sweetened and flavored with nutmeg.

*Steamed Ginger Pudding, Vanilla Sauce, February 21
August 10
Cream one-third cup butter, add gradually one-half cup sugar, and one egg well beaten. Mix and sift two and one-fourth cups flour, three and one-half teaspoons baking powder, one-fourth teaspoon salt, and two teaspoons ginger; add alternately with one cup milk to first mixture. Turn into buttered mould, cover, and steam two hours. Serve with vanilla sauce.

Steamed Ginger Sponge, A New Book of Cookery, p. 257
February 26
1/2 cup butter                3 teaspoons baking powder
2 tablespoons sugar    1/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs                            1/4 cup Canton ginger, cut
1 cup milk                       into small pieces
2 1/2 cups flour             1 tablespoon ginger syrup
Cream butter and add sugar gradually and eggs, well beaten; then add milk alternately with flour, mixed and sifted with baking powder and salt. Add ginger and ginger syrup and turn into a buttered mould. Steam one and three-fourths hours. Remove from mould and serve with half-pint bottle heavy cream, beaten until stiff and sweetened with four tablespoons powdered sugar and flavored with two tablespoons ginger syrup.

*Steamed Rice, Strawberry Sauce, June 8
Steam cook one cup rice until soft, using one-half water and one-half milk and serve hot with strawberry sauce. For sauce, work one-half cup butter until creamy, using a wooden spoon.then add gradually while beating constantly, one and one-half cups powdered sugar. Wash and hull one quart box strawberries, cut in halves, and let stand in a warm place fifteen minutes. Add to butter and sugar mixture and beat until well blended.

Steamed Winter Squash, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 301
January 26
Cut in pieces, remove seeds and stringy portion, and pare. Place in a strainer and cook thirty minutes, or until soft, over boiling water. Mash, and season with butter, salt, and pepper. If lacking in sweetness, add a small quantity of sugar.

Sterling Fruit Pudding, A New Book of Cookery, p. 255
March 3
1 cup suet                          1 cup raisins
2 2/3 cups stale bread      3/4 cup currants
crumbs                                1/8 cup flour
1 cup grated raw carrot      1 1/2 teaspoon salt
Yolks 4 eggs                         1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 1/3 cups brown sugar       1/3 teaspoon grated nutmeg
Grated rind 1 lemon             1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 tablespoon vinegar           Whites 4 eggs
Work suet until creamy, using the hand, and add bread crumbs and carrot. beat egg yolks until light and add gradually, while beating constantly, sugar. Combine mixtures and add lemon rind and vinegar. Mix raisins, seeded and cut in pieces, with currants  and dredge with flour, mixed and sifted with salt and spices. Add to mixture with whites of eggs, beaten until stiff. Turn into a buttered mould garnished with citron (cut in thin slices, then in fancy shapes), and adjust cover. Steam three and one-half hours. Serve with Mousselaine Brandy Sauce.

Sterling Sauce, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 409
1/2 cup butter                   1 teaspoon vanilla or
1 cup brown sugar              2 tablespoons wine
4 tablespoons cream or milk
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and milk and flavoring drop by drop to prevent separation.

*Stewed Chickens with Onions, August 13
Remove breasts and second joints from two chickens. Cook in water to cover with fifteen small onions until tender. Remove chicken; reduce stock to one and one-half cups. Drain onions from stock. Melt three tablespoons butter, add four tablespoons flour, and the stock. Bring to boiling point add one-half cup heavy cream. Season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Add onions and chicken and bring to the boiling point.

*Stewed Stuffed Figs, October 13
Stuff one-half pound washed figs with chopped salted almonds. Put two tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon lemon juice, and one-half cup sherry in saucepan; when heated, add figs, cover, and cook until figs are tender, turning and basting often. Cool and serve with or without whipped cream.

Stewed Tomatoes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 302
March 16, May 30
Wipe, pare, cut in pieces, put in stewpan, and cook slowly twenty minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with butter, salt, and pepper.

*Strawberry Baskets, June 26
Beat yolks four eggs until thick, add one cup sugar gradually, and beat two minutes; add three tablespoons water. Put one and one-half tablespoons cornstarch in cup and fill cup with flour. Mix and shift cornstarch and flour with one and one-fourth teaspoons baking powder and one-fourth teaspoon salt, add to first mixture. Add whites four eggs beaten stiff and one teaspoon lemon extract. Fill buttered gem pans and bake. Cool, scoop out centers and fill with sweetened crushed strawberries.

Strawberry Cottage Pudding, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 395
July 28, August 24
1/3 cup butter
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
1 3/4 cups flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
Mix same as Cottage Pudding, and bake twenty-five minutes in shallow pan; cut in squares and serve with strawberries (sprinkled with sugar and slightly mashed) and Cream Sauce I. Sliced peaches may be used in place of strawberries.

*Strawberry Ice, June 3
Wash and hull one quart box of strawberries, sprinkle with one cupful sugar, cover, and let stand two hours. Mash and squeeze through a double thickness of cheese-cloth. To juice thus obtained, add one cup water and lemon juice to taste. Freeze, using three parts finely crushed ice to one part rock salt.

*Strawberry Ice Cream, June 7
Wash, pick over, hull and mash one quart strawberries. Sprinkle with one cup sugar, cover, and let stand several hours; then squeeze through a double thickness of cheese-cloth. Mix one and one-half cups heavy cream, one and one-half cups milk, whites of four eggs, beaten until stiff, and one-eighth teaspoon salt. Freeze to a mush, using three parts finely crushed ice to one part rock salt. Add fruit juice and continue the freezing. If the fruit is acid more sugar may be necessary.

Strawberry Mousse, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 454
June 21
1 quart thin cream                         1/4 box gelatine (scant) or
1 box strawberries                         1 1/4 tablespoons granulated gelatine
1 cup sugar                                     2 tablespoons cold water
3 tablespoons hot water
Wash and hull berries, sprinkle with sugar, and let stand one hour; mash, and rub through a fine sieve; add gelatine soaked in cold and dissolved in boiling water. Set in pan of ice-water and stir until it begins to thicken; then fold in whip from cream, put in mould, cover, pack in salt and ice, and let stand four hours. Raspberries may be used in place of strawberries.

*Strawberry Sauce (Steamed Rice), June 8
For sauce, work one-half cup butter until creamy, using a wooden spoon.then add gradually while beating constantly, one and one-half cups powdered sugar. Wash and hull one quart box strawberries, cut in halves, and let stand in a warm place fifteen minutes. Add to butter and sugar mixture and beat until well blended.

Strawberry Short Cake, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 83
May 22
Strawberry Short Cake I
2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup butter
Mix dry ingredients, sift twice, work in butter with tips of fingers, and add milk gradually. Toss on floured board, divide in two parts. Pat, roll out, and bake twelve minutes in a hot oven in buttered Washington pie or round layer cake tins. Split, and spread with butter. Sweeten strawberries to taste, place on back of range until warmed, crush slightly, and put between and on top of Short Cakes; cover top with Cream Sauce I.

Strawberry Short Cake II
2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/3 cup butter
3/4 cup milk
Mix same as Strawberry Short Cake I. Toss and roll on floured board. Put in round buttered tin, and shape with back of hand to fit pan.

String Beans, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 285
May 31, June 16, July 2, July 10, July 18, July 26, August 2, August 12, August 23
Remove strings, and snap or cut in one-inch pieces; wash, and cook in boiling water from one to three hours, adding salt last half-hour of cooking. Drain, season with butter and salt.

String Bean Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 329
January 17, June 4, June 12
Marinate two cups cold string beans with French Dressing. Add one teaspoon finely cut chives. Pile in centre of salad dish and arrange around base thin slices of radishes overlapping one another. Garnish top with radish cut to represent a tulip.

*Stuffed Cucumbers, August 28
Wipe and peel cucumbers, cut in two-inch pieces, crosswise, removing seeds. Mix four tablespoons bread crumbs, two tablespoons finely chopped cooked ham, and two tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese. Moisten with tomato sauce and season with salt and cayenne. Put cucumber cups in pan, fill with mixture, surround with chicken stock, and bake thirty minutes. Cover with buttered bread crumbs and bake until crumbs are brown.

Stuffed Cushion of Veal, Brown Mushroom Sauce, A New Book of Cookery, p. 126
July 12
Order a five-pound cushion of veal (a piece cut from the upper part of the leg). Wipe, stuff and truss. Put one-fourth pound butter in a hot iron frying pan and when melted add veal and cook until the entire surface is seared and well browned, turning frequently, using a two-tined fork to prevent piercing. Cover and bake in a hot oven from one and one-half to two hours. Remove to hot platter, garnish with parsley and serve with Brown Mushroom Sauce.
Stuffing.— Toast six slices of stale baker’s bread, cut one-half inch in thickness, with crusts removed. Pour over brown or chicken stock to moisten. Add one two-inch cube fat salt pork, finely chopped, one hard-boiled egg, finely chopped, and one-fourth pound mushroom caps, cleaned, peeled, sautéd in butter three minutes and cut in strips. Season with salt and pepper.
Brown Mushroom Sauce. — Pour off one-fourth cup fat remaining in pan, add five tablespoons flour and stir until well blended; then pour on gradually, while stirring constantly, one and one-fourth cups brown stock, bring to the boiling point and add one-third cup mushroom liquor (obtained by cooking stems and peeling of mushroom caps). Season with salt and pepper, add fat remaining in pan, stirring vigorously, and strain through a double thickness of cheese-cloth, placed over a strainer. Add one-half pound mushroom caps, cleaned, peeled, cut in slices and sauted in butter three minutes. Bring to the boiling point and serve at once.

Stuffed Eggplant, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 293
January 10
Cook eggplant fifteen minutes in boiling salted water to cover. Cut a slice from top, and with a spoon remove pulp, taking care not to work too closely to skin. Chop pulp, and add one cup soft stale bread crumbs. Melt two tablespoons butter, add one-half tablespoon finely chopped onion, and cook five minutes, or try out three slices of bacon, using bacon fat in place of butter. Add to chopped pulp and bread, season with salt and pepper. Add to chopped pulp and bread, season with salt and pepper, and if necessary moisten with a little stock or water; cook five minutes, cool slightly, and add one beaten egg. Refill eggplant, cover with buttered bread crumbs, and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven.

*Stuffed Eggs, June 11
Cut hard-boiled eggs in halves lengthwise. Remove yolks and put whites aside in pairs. Marsh[sic] yolks, and add half the amount of devilled[sic] ham and enough melted butter to make of consistency to shape. Make in balls size of original yolks, and refill whites. Form remainder of mixture into a nest. Arrange eggs in the nest and pour over one cup white sauce. Sprinkle with buttered crumbs, and bake until crumbs are brown.

*Stuffed Figs, April 15
Mash cream cheese, moisten with heavy cream and season highly with salt and cayenne; then make into balls three-fourths inch in diameter. Wash and dry figs, make an incision in each, and stuff with cheese balls. Arrange in piles on a plate covered with a lace paper doily.

*Stuffed Onions, September 11
March 17
Remove skins from onions, and parboil ten minutes in boiling salted water to cover. Turn upside down to cool, and remove part of centres. Fill cavities with equal parts of finely chopped cooked chicken, stale soft bread crumbs, and finely chopped onion which was removed, seasoned with salt and pepper, and moistened with melted butter. Place in buttered baking-pan, sprinkle with buttered crumbs, and bake in a moderate oven until onions are soft.

*Stuffed Peppers, December 30
Wipe four green peppers and parboil ten minutes in one quart water, to which has been added one-fourth teaspoon soda. Cut in halves, lengthwise, remove seeds, fill with creamed oysters, cover with buttered crumbs, and brown under gas flame. For the oysters, wash one quart oysters and cook until plump. Drain and add to sauce made of three tablespoons butter, three and one-half tablespoons flour, one and one-half cups milk, three-fourths teaspoon salt, and a few grains pepper.

*Stuffed Peppers, Corn Mixture, August 29
Cut slice from stem end of each pepper, remove seeds, and parboil peppers. Drain and fill with Corn Mixture. Remove husks from a dozen ears corn. Cut lengthwise of cob through each row of kernels and scrape with a knife to remove pulp. Put two and one-half cups pulp in pan, add one-half cup milk, ad cook slowly twenty-five minutes, stirring frequently. Season with butter, salt, and pepper.

Stuffed Tomato Salad, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 332
July 30
Stuffed Tomato Salad I
Peel medium-sized tomatoes. Remove thin slice from top of each and take out seeds and some of pulp. Sprinkle inside with salt, invert, and let stand one-half hour. Fill tomatoes with cucumbers cut in small cubes and mixed with Mayonnaise Dressing. Arrange on lettuce leaves, and garnish top of each with Mayonnaise Dressing forced through a pastry bag and tube.

Stuffed Tomato Salad II
Prepare tomatoes same as for Tomatoes Stuffed with Pineapple. Refill with finely cut celery and apple, using equal parts. Serve with Mayonnaise, and garnish with shredded lettuce.

*Stuffing for Chicken, September 20
Melt two-thirds cup butter in one-third cup water and pour over two cups cracker crumbs. Add one-third cup scalded milk and season with salt, pepper, and powdered sage. If stuffing is to be served cold, add one beaten egg, which admits of better slices.

Succotash, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 291
July 30, August 1, August 6, August 17, August 19, August 24, August 30
Cut hot boiled corn from cob, add equal quantity of hot boiled shelled beans; season with butter and salt; reheat before serving.

Sugared Beets, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 286
March 7, June 1
4 hot boiled beets            1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons butter        1/2 teaspoon salt
Cut beets in one-fourth inch slices, add butter, sugar, and salt; reheat for serving.

Sultana Sticks, A New Book of Cookery, p. 323
June 28
1 cup sugar                                   1/2 cup flour
1/4 cup melted butter                 1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg, unbeaten                           1/4 teaspoon vanilla
2 squares melted chocolate       1/4 cup Sultana raisins
1/4 cup chopped English walnut meats
Mix ingredients in order given. Line a seven-inch square pan with paraffine paper, put in mixture, spread evenly and bake in a slow oven. Remove from pan, take off paper and cut at once in bars three and one-half by one and three-quarters inches.

*Swedish Baked Halibut, March 27
Wipe a slice of halibut weighing one pound. Place in shallow earthen baking dish, sprinkle with salt and pepper and brush over with melted butter. Drain canned tomatoes and measure; there should be three-fourths cup. To tomatoes add one-half teaspoon powdered sugar and spread over fish. Cover with one-half peeled onion thinly sliced crosswise. Bake twenty minutes, pour over one-third cup heavy cream, and bake ten minutes. Remove onion and garnish fish with parsley.

Swedish Timbales, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 362
June 17, July 4
3/4 cup flour               1/2  cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt       1 egg
1 teaspoon sugar        1 tablespoon olive oil
Mix dry ingredients, add milk gradually, and beaten egg; then add olive oil. Shape, using a hot timbale iron, fry in deep fat until crisp and brown; take from iron and invert on brown paper to drain.
To Heat Timbale Iron. Heat fat until nearly hot enough to fry uncooked mixtures. Put iron into hot fat, having fat deep enough to more than cover it, and let stand until heated. The only way of knowing when iron is of right temperature is to take it from fat, shake what fat may drip from it, lower in batter to three-fourths its depth, raise from batter, then immerse in hot fat. If batter does not cling to iron, or drops from iron as soon as immersed in fat, it is either too hot or not sufficiently heated.
To Form Timbales. Turn timbale batter into a cup. Lower hot iron into cup, taking care that batter covers iron to only three-fourths its depth. When immersed in fat, mixture will rise to top of iron, and when crisp and brown may be easily slipped off. If too much batter is used, in cooking it will rise over top of iron, and in order to remove timbale it must be cut around with a sharp knife close to top of iron. If the cases are soft rather than crisp, batter is too thick and must be diluted with milk.
Fill cases with Creamed Oysters, Chicken, Sweetbreads, or Chicken and Sweetbreads in combination with Mushrooms.

Swedish Wafers, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 492
January 25, July 22, August 23
1/2 cup butter               5 ozs. flour
1/2 cup sugar                1/4 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs                            Shredded almonds
Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, eggs slightly beaten, flour, and flavoring. Drop by spoonfuls on an inverted buttered dripping-pan. Spread very thinly, using a knife, in circular shapes about three inches in diameter. Sprinkle with almonds, and bake in a slow oven. Remove from pan, and shape at once over the handle of a wooden spoon.

*Sweetbread and Cucumber Salad, August 26
Parboil a sweetbread, adding two slices of onion. Cool and cut in cubes. Add an equal quantity of cucumber cubes. Beat one-half cup thick cream until stiff; add one-fourth tablespoon gelatine soaked in one-half tablespoon cold water and dissolved in one and one-half tablespoons boiling water, then add one and one-half tablespoons vinegar. Add sweetbread and cucumber, mould, and chill.

Sweet Potato Balls, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 318
To two cups hot riced sweet potatoes add three tablespoons butter, one-half teaspoon salt, few grains pepper, and one beaten egg. Shape in small balls, roll in flour, fry in deep fat, and drain. If potatoes are very dry, it will be necessary to add hot milk to moisten.

Sweet Potato Croquettes, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 318
April 12
Prepare mixture for Sweet Potato Balls. Shape in croquettes, dip in crumbs, egg, and crumbs again, fry in deep fat, and drain.

Sweet Potatoes, Southern Style, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 317
May 6
Bake six medium-sized sweet potatoes, remove from oven, cut in halves lengthwise, and scoop out inside. Mash, add two tablespoons butter, and cream to moisten. Season with salt and Sherry wine. Refill skins and bake five minutes in a hot oven.

*Sweet Potatoes with Apples, October 28
Put one cup boiled sweet potatoes (cut in one-fourth inch slices) in a buttered baking dish. Cover with three-fourths cup pared and thinly sliced apples; sprinkle with one-fourth cup brown sugar, dot over with two tablespoons butter, and sprinkle with one-half teaspoon salt; repeat. Bake in a moderate oven one hour.

Swiss Chard, A New Book of Cookery, p. 166
July 27
Pick over, wash, and drain one peck Swiss chard. Cook twenty-five minutes in two quarts boiling water, to which has been added one tablespoon salt. Drain, re-heat, and season with butter, salt, and pepper. Serve with vinegar.

Swiss Potato Soup, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, p. 139
4 small potatoes                    1/2 onions
1 large flat white turnip         4 tablespoons butter
3 cups boiling water              1/3 cup flour
1 quart scalded milk               1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
Wash, pare, and cut potatoes in halves. Wash, pare, and cut turnips in one-quarter inch slices. Parboil together ten minutes, drain, add onion cut in slices, and three cups boiling water. Cook until vegetables are soft; drain, reserving the water to add to vegetables after rubbing them through a sieve. Add milk, reheat, and bind with butter and flour cooked together. Season with salt and pepper.