March 1

03-01
*Cream of Celery Soup
Roast Leg of Lamb
Currant Jelly Sauce
Glazed Sweet Potatoes
Brussels Sprouts
Radishes
Caramel Custard, Caramel Sauce
Wafer Crackers
Bar-le-duc Currants
Cream Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 March 1 was a Sunday.

Celery Soup yesterday and Cream of Celery Soup today?

We had Glazed Sweet Potatoes yesterday as well. Were you supposed to make two batches at once and reheat one today?

The Caramel Sauce recipe is attributed to Miss Parloa. Maria Parloa was the long-time cook at Appledore House, a hotel in Maine and wrote The Appledore Cook Book. She could be considered a celebrity chef and was one of the first instructors at The Boston Cooking School, as well as running her own cooking school.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

February 15

02-15*Italian Canapés
Roast Turkey, New England Stuffing
Franconia Potatoes
Mashed Squash
Creamed Celery
Pineapple Coupe
Marguerites
Café Noir

In 1914 February 15 was a Sunday.

Pineapple CoupeWe get two desserts today — Pineapple Coupe is a fruit cup with ice cream and a very precise garnish. Marguerites could be one of two kinds of gooey little treats.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 31

01-31
Chicken Soup
Souffléd Crackers
Fried Scallops
Shadow Potatoes
Celery Salad
*Baked Bananas, Currant Jelly Sauce

In 1914 January 31 was a Saturday.

The intriguingly named Shadow Potatoes, also called Saratoga Chips, are thinly-sliced, deep-fried potatoes, that is, potato chips!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 23

01-23
Chicken Soup with Rice
Baked Halibut, Hollandaise Sauce
Shredded Potatoes
Cabbage and Celery Salad
*Escalloped Apples

In 1914 January 23 was a Friday. Guess what? Fish again!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 15

01-15

Broiled Oysters
Celery
Bread Sticks
*Boiled Calves’ Tongues
Mashed Squash
Riced Potatoes
Lettuce and Cucumber Salad
Saltines
Mince Pie
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 January 15 was a Thursday.

Ricing potatoes was a pretty common treatment at this time, which seems to have fallen out of favor. Does anyone use a ricer? I’ve got one on my wish list…

The lettuce and cucumber salad is deceptively simple, but the presentation is everything — alternating leaves of lettuce and slices of cucumber. 
A Chapon. Remove a small piece from end of French loaf and rub over with a clove of garlic, first dipped in salt. Place in bottom of salad bowl before arranging salad. A chapon is often used in vegetable salads, and gives an agreeable additional flavor.” (The Boston Cooking School Cook Book, p. 323)

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 11

01-11
French Chicken Soup
Hominy Croûtons
*Rabbit à la Southern
Anchovied Potatoes
Endive Salad
Celery in White Sauce
Wheat Crispies
Chocolate Ice Cream
Lady Baltimore Cake
Café Noir

In 1914 January 11 was a Sunday.

Wheat Crispies are a brand of cracker made by O. B. Gilman, a Boston bakery.

The chocolate ice cream calls for squares of Baker’s chocolate. This is a brand of unsweetened chocolate still available today, originally made in a factory in Boston, right down the road from me (it’s luxury apartments now).  In Fannie’s the unsweetened chocolate came in individually wrapped squares, each weighing one ounce. Now the chocolate comes in bars, but it’s easy enough to convert squares to ounces.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed in my quest for greater historical accuracy in my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!