March 20

03-20
Chicken Gumbo
Fried Scallops, Sauce Tartare
Julienne Potatoes
French Bread
*Moulded Cheese with Bar-le-duc Strawberries
Butter Thins
Café Noir

In 1914 March 20 was a Friday. Once again, we have fish. Although there’s also chicken in the soup.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 19

03-19

Lima Bean Soup
Croûtons
*Florentine Eggs
French Fried Potatoes
Corn à la Southern
Apple Tapioca

In 1914 March 19 was a Thursday.

I made the Florentine Eggs! You can see the process in the video below.

True confession — I don’t like eggs, so I arranged for a Special Guest Taste Tester.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 18

03-18
In 1914 March 18 was a Wednesday. As usual for the day after a special menu, we get the recipe for the day before and no menu for the day itself.

The Irish Iceberg is a renaming of “Icebergs” on page 437 of The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. I’m not sure how well lemon and mint go together…
“Leaf green” is a food coloring. In her recipe for Crême de Menthe Ice, just above in the cook book, she specifically calls for Burnett’s. Joseph Burnett was a Boston chemist who developed a line of extracts, perfumes and other toiletries, and food colorings.

Crême de Menthe was invented in 1885 by chemist Émile Giffard in Angers, France. The original liqueur was clear. A couple of years later he developed the green version.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 17, St. Patrick’s Day

03-17Cream of Spinach Soup
Souffléd Crackers
Fillets of Halibut
Cucumber Ribbons
Kernels of Pork
Potato Nests
Stuffed Onions
Malaga Salad
Wheat Crispies
*Irish Iceberg
Shamrock Wafers
Toasted Cracker
Roquefort
Café Noir

In 1914 March 17 was a Tuesday.

No corned beef and cabbage here! We do have some green foods and thematic desserts. Cream of Spinach Soup, Cucumber Ribbons, and Malaga Salad are all various shades of green. You’re also supposed to tint the lemon ice for the Irish Iceberg with leaf green. You also pour crême de menthe over it presumably the green colored version.  And serve it with Shamrock Wafers.

I don’t know how the halibut fillets are suppose to be prepared, so I leave that up to you.

The Potato Nests are supposed to be filled with something. Maybe the Kernels of Pork?

Malagas are white grapes, which, of course, means that they’re green.

I can’t find a specific recipe for Shamrock Wafers. Maybe they’re just cookies cut in shamrock shapes.

There are three different kinds of crackers served with this meal! Souffléd Crackers (with the soup) are made with common crackers, Wheat Crispies (with the salad) are a commercial brand, and toasted crackers  (with the cheese) could be almost anything.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 16

03-16Pea Soup
Crisp Crackers
Cold Sliced Veal
Escalloped Potatoes
Stewed Tomatoes
*Lettuce, Columbia French Dressing
Rebecca Pudding, Chocolate Sauce

In 1914 March 16 was a Monday.

As usual on Monday, we’re having cold leftovers from Sunday’s roast.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 15

03-15

*Sardine Cocktails
Roast Stuffed Leg of Veal
Savory Potatoes
Egg Plant à la Turque
Chiccory and Celery Salad
Montrose Pudding
Peanut Wafers
Wheat Wafers
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 March 15 was a Sunday.

Despite being called a pudding, Montrose pudding is actually a molded, frozen dessert with a very specific garnish.
Montrose Pudding

I think the Wheat Wafers are probably Educator Wafers, a whole wheat cracker made in Boston.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 14

03-14
Celery and Tomato Purée
Imperial Sticks
Broiled Steak, Oyster Blanket
*Potatoes en Casserole
Lettuce and Radish Salad, French Dressing
Raisin Puff, Wine Sauce

In 1914 March 14 was a Saturday.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 13

03-13
Fried Fillets of Halibut
Potato Balls
Escalloped Tomatoes
Lettuce, Curry Dressing
Butter Thins
*Jellied Prunes
Nut Caramel Cake

In 1914 March 13 was a Friday. And yes, we have fish again.

Butter Thins were one of the crackers made by the Johnson Educator Food Company, a favorite of Miss Farmer. She endorses many of their products.

Nut Caramel Cake is a mystery. I can’t find it in any of the Fannie Farmer cookbooks available to me. Let me know if you know where the recipe is!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 12

03-12
French Fried Potatoes
Corn Oysters
*Turnips, New York Style
Lettuce and Celery Salad
Salted Wafers
Newton Tapioca
Crackers
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 March 12 was a Thursday.

I’m guessing Newton Pudding was named after the Massachusetts town of Newton, also the namesake of Fig Newtons (first produced in 1891).

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!