January 21

01-21
No menu today, just the recipe from the day before. Maybe we’re supposed to eat leftovers.

This happens throughout the year — one day has a big, festive menu and the featured recipe is on the following day without a new menu. So the claim of 365 menus and 365 recipes is slightly exaggerated.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much! To become a Patron, go to my Patreon page or donate here.

January 20, Formal Dinner

01-20
Finnan Haddie Canapés
Potage d’Avignon
Bread Sticks
Celery
Olives
Broiled Trout, Maître d’Hôtel
Dressed Cucumbers
Bouchées of Sweetbread
Roast Crown of Lamb, Currant Mint Sauce
Potato Balls
Oyster Plant au Gratin
Sautéd Quail à la Moquin
Grape Fruit and Pepper Salad
*Vanilla Ice Cream, Fruit Sauce
Marguerites
Crackers
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 January 20 was a Tuesday. Why are we having a formal dinner on Tuesday? It’s my sister’s birthday and that’s a good enough reason for me.

There is a lot going on in this meal…

Finnan Haddie is cold-smoked haddock. Our local butcher shop carries it, so I should give it a try.

Bouchées are small pastry cases.

The Potato Balls are shaped with a French vegetable cutter. They were used to cut fruits and vegetables into ball shapes, but I have yet to find an image of one, let alone an actual cutter. Let me know if you’ve ever seen one!

Oyster Plant is a common name for salsify and according to Fannie Farmer “Oyster plant is in season from October to March.” I haven’t found a recipe for Oyster Plant au Gratin, but you could probably make Potatoes au Gratin and substitute salsify root. Fannie Farmer says to cook it so: “Wash, scrape, and put at once into cold acidulated water to prevent discoloration. Cut in inch slices, cook in boiling salted water until soft, drain”.

Quail à la Moquin is presumably named after restauranteur Henri Mouquin. Mouquin came to New York from Switzerland, via Paris, and began his career as a waiter at the famed Delmonico’s. Mouquin opened three restaurants in New York, with his wife, Marie Granjean as chef. She is credited with introducing French onion soup to the United States.

There are two recipes for Marguerites in The Boston Cookery-School Cook Book. Both look like sweet little treats. One is a pastry and the other is more like divinity, but baked on saltines!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 19

01-19
French Tomato Soup
Duchess Crusts
Cold Sliced Roast Beef
*Potato Salad
Dinner Rolls
Steamed Fruit Pudding, Brandy Sauce

In 1914 January 19 was a Monday.

We’re having the leftover beef from last night as simple cold meat. Very thrifty!M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 18

01-18
Caviare Canapés
Rump Beef Roast, Brown Gravy
Creamed Potatoes
Glazed Silver Skins
Lettuce and Radish Salad
Peanut Brown Bread Sandwiches
*Canton Cream
Raised Loaf Cake
Café Noir

In 1914 January 18 was a Sunday.

Silver skins are another name for pearl onions — small onions often creamed or pickled.

Canton ginger is ginger preserved in syrup. The Canton Cream  uses both the ginger and its syrup.

The Raised Loaf Cake is made with bread sponge, a mixture of yeast, liquid, and flour that’s allowed to ferment before the rest of the bread ingredients are added.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 17

01-17
Fried Pork Chops
*Beets Piquant
Boiled Potatoes
String Bean Salad
Brown Bread Sandwiches
Chocolate Cream
Café Noir

In 1914 January 17 was a Saturday.

The brown bread for the sandwiches “is best steamed in one-pound baking-powder boxes”. I might need to acquire some reproduction 1914 baking-powder boxes, so I can properly make brown bread.

Chocolate Cream starts as a standard cornstarch pudding, but has beaten egg whites added in at the end, making it lighter and airier.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 16

01-16
Celery Soup
Dinner Biscuits
Boiled Halibut, *Huntington Sauce
Mashed Potatoes
Tomato Soufflé
Fig Custard
Café Noir

In 1914 January 16 was a Friday. Fish again!

I am guessing the Huntington Sauce is in honor of Ralph Huntington, who was instrumental in the creation of Back Bay (for those not local, it’s a neighborhood that was built the 19th century on what was once a tidal bay) and for whom Huntington Avenue was named.

Perhaps today’s Mashed Potatoes are made from leftovers from yesterday’s Riced Potatoes.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 15

01-15

Broiled Oysters
Celery
Bread Sticks
*Boiled Calves’ Tongues
Mashed Squash
Riced Potatoes
Lettuce and Cucumber Salad
Saltines
Mince Pie
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 January 15 was a Thursday.

Ricing potatoes was a pretty common treatment at this time, which seems to have fallen out of favor. Does anyone use a ricer? I’ve got one on my wish list…

The lettuce and cucumber salad is deceptively simple, but the presentation is everything — alternating leaves of lettuce and slices of cucumber. 
A Chapon. Remove a small piece from end of French loaf and rub over with a clove of garlic, first dipped in salt. Place in bottom of salad bowl before arranging salad. A chapon is often used in vegetable salads, and gives an agreeable additional flavor.” (The Boston Cooking School Cook Book, p. 323)

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 14

01-14
French Smelts, Sauce Tartare
Shredded Potatoes
French String Beans
*Fruit Salad, French Dressing
Mosaic Sandwiches
Apple Pie
Cheese Slices
Café Noir

In 1914 January 14 was a Wednesday.

The fruit salad is served with a vinaigrette, so consider it the salad course and not a dessert.

Mosaic Sandwiches are just bread and butter sandwiches, but with two colors of bread cut and assembled to form a checkerboard pattern.
Mosaic SandwichesPhoto from A New Book of Cookery (1912).

Apple pie with cheese is a pretty common New England treat. I think it’s best with a sharp cheddar.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 13

01-13
Royal Soup
Imperial Sticks
Breaded Lamb Chops, Tomato Sauce
*Baked Potatoes, Hotel Style
Moulded Spinach
Wafer Crackers
Cream Cheese
Bar-le-duc Strawberries
Café Noir

In 1914 January 13 was a Tuesday.

Royal Soup with Imperial Sticks sounds so grand! The reality is a very frugal soup with toasted stale bread.

I found a recipe for Breaded Mutton Chops, but not lamb. It should work about the same, maybe with a shortened cooking time.

Bar-le-Duc strawberries are a kind of preserve. The town is famous for their currant preserves, in which the ripe currants are hand-seeded using a goose quill, leaving the fruit intact, like little pearls or caviar. I’m told that they pop delightfully in your mouth, but I haven’t been lucky enough to taste it. I also haven’t found much information about the strawberry version, but I assume it was just as delicious and just as much of a status symbol.

UPDATE: Canning, Preserving and Pickling by Marion Harris Neil (1914) has a recipe!

STRAWBERRY BAR-LE-DUC, p. 124
Perfect strawberries. Sugar.
Three things are indispensable in making strawberry bar-le-duc. The first is strong, steady sunshine, the second, hot platters or plates, the third plenty of window-glass.
The fruit should be of good flavor, the sugar pure. To every pound of fruit allow three cupfuls of sugar. Heat the sugar on plates in the oven, taking care not to let it melt or get too brown. It should be as hot as possible without melting.
Spread a thin layer of hot sugar over the bottoms of hot platters or deep plates, then a layer of fruit and then another layer of sugar.
Cover the platters with a clean sheet of window-glass and place outdoors in the hot sun or in a sunny window. If the fruit is outdoors it must be brought in when the sun sets and put in a dry place indoors.
Return to the sun in the morning. In a few days the fruit will grow plump and firm and the syrup almost a jelly.
Pack in tumblers and seal.
If the syrup is not thick, boil until clear and thickened, then pour in the glasses over the fruit.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed in my quest for greater historical accuracy in my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 12

01-12
Swiss Potato Soup
Broiled Porterhouse Steak
French Fried Potatoes
Creamed Cauliflower
*Dresden Sandwiches, Sherry Sauce

In 1914 January 12 was a Monday.

Dresden Sandwiches are French toast sandwiches with jam filling.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed in my quest for greater historical accuracy in my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!