July 4, Independence Day Dinner

07-04

Iced Pimiento Consomme
Creamed Sweetbreads in Timbale Cases
Cold Sliced Boiled Ham
Scrub Potatoes
Dinner Rolls
Asparagus Salad, French Dressing
Strawberry Bomb
Grandma’s Pound Cakes
*Fruit Punch

In 1914 July 4 was a Saturday.

I haven’t found a recipe for the Strawberry Bomb. A bomb is a moulded ice cream with an outer shell of one flavor and an inner filling of a different one. I assume that one of them was strawberry. : )

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

April 12, An Easter Dinner

04-12

Frozen Egg Nog in Egg Shells
Clear Mushroom Soup
Souffléd Crackers
Shad à la Delmonico
Cucumber Ribbons
Roast Capon, Brown Gravy
Sweet Potato Croquettes
Moulded Spinach
Dressed Lettuce
Cheese
Eggs
Toasterettes
*Easter Pudding
Mock Macaroons
Café Noir

In 1914 April 12 was Easter Sunday. As usual on Sunday there is an elaborate meal featuring a roast. There are also some special dishes for the holiday, like the Frozen Egg Nog in Egg Shells, and of course, the Easter Pudding.

For those expecting an Easter Ham, we have Roast Capon instead.

I am curious about the eggs on the sixth line of the menu. Here it clearly looks like there are four items: Dressed Lettuce, Cheese, Eggs, Toasterettes. However, one of the Easter Menus in What to Have for Dinner has a recipe for Cheese Eggs. Maybe it’s a spacing error on the card.

The Mock Macaroons remain a mystery for now.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 17, St. Patrick’s Day

03-17Cream of Spinach Soup
Souffléd Crackers
Fillets of Halibut
Cucumber Ribbons
Kernels of Pork
Potato Nests
Stuffed Onions
Malaga Salad
Wheat Crispies
*Irish Iceberg
Shamrock Wafers
Toasted Cracker
Roquefort
Café Noir

In 1914 March 17 was a Tuesday.

No corned beef and cabbage here! We do have some green foods and thematic desserts. Cream of Spinach Soup, Cucumber Ribbons, and Malaga Salad are all various shades of green. You’re also supposed to tint the lemon ice for the Irish Iceberg with leaf green. You also pour crême de menthe over it presumably the green colored version.  And serve it with Shamrock Wafers.

I don’t know how the halibut fillets are suppose to be prepared, so I leave that up to you.

The Potato Nests are supposed to be filled with something. Maybe the Kernels of Pork?

Malagas are white grapes, which, of course, means that they’re green.

I can’t find a specific recipe for Shamrock Wafers. Maybe they’re just cookies cut in shamrock shapes.

There are three different kinds of crackers served with this meal! Souffléd Crackers (with the soup) are made with common crackers, Wheat Crispies (with the salad) are a commercial brand, and toasted crackers  (with the cheese) could be almost anything.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

March 5, Vegetable Dinner

03-05
Vegetable Soup
French Fried Potatoes
Escalloped Corn
Moulded Spinach, Egg Garnish
Dressed Lettuce
*Ginger Pudding, Foamy Sauce

In 1914 March 5 was a Thursday. 

Another Vegetable Dinner! I thought the first one was the only one. I wonder if we’ll get more over the course of the year. It’s also pretty similar to the menu we had a week ago  on February 25.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

February 22, Washington’s Birthday Dinner

02-22
Oyster Cocktails
Pimiento Consommé
Bread Sticks
Maryland Chicken
Hominy, Virginia Style
Corn à la Southern
Huntington Salad
Brown Bread Sandwiches
*Frozen Pudding
Sponge Cakes
Toasted Crackers
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 February 22 was a Sunday. It’s also a holiday, so we have a special, elaborate menu today in honor of the first president.

As Washington was a son of Virginia, the menu skews southern. Or, at least, a New England version of southern cooking… We get a very Bostonian salad and sandwich.

It’s interesting that there’s no cherry pie, a staple of mid-century Washington’s Birthday menus. Instead we get frozen pudding, but we’ll have to wait until tomorrow for the recipe.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

February 4, Vegetable Menu

02-04
French Fried Potatoes
*Corn Soufflé
Spinach à la Béchamel
Dressed Lettuce with Pimiento Ribbons
Baked Indian Pudding
Wafer Crackers
Cream Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 February 4 was a Wednesday.

An all-vegetable meal must have been so unusual that it got its own special day.

Wafer Crackers were whole wheat crackers made by the Johnson Educator Food Company in Boston.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 20, Formal Dinner

01-20
Finnan Haddie Canapés
Potage d’Avignon
Bread Sticks
Celery
Olives
Broiled Trout, Maître d’Hôtel
Dressed Cucumbers
Bouchées of Sweetbread
Roast Crown of Lamb, Currant Mint Sauce
Potato Balls
Oyster Plant au Gratin
Sautéd Quail à la Moquin
Grape Fruit and Pepper Salad
*Vanilla Ice Cream, Fruit Sauce
Marguerites
Crackers
Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 January 20 was a Tuesday. Why are we having a formal dinner on Tuesday? It’s my sister’s birthday and that’s a good enough reason for me.

There is a lot going on in this meal…

Finnan Haddie is cold-smoked haddock. Our local butcher shop carries it, so I should give it a try.

Bouchées are small pastry cases.

The Potato Balls are shaped with a French vegetable cutter. They were used to cut fruits and vegetables into ball shapes, but I have yet to find an image of one, let alone an actual cutter. Let me know if you’ve ever seen one!

Oyster Plant is a common name for salsify and according to Fannie Farmer “Oyster plant is in season from October to March.” I haven’t found a recipe for Oyster Plant au Gratin, but you could probably make Potatoes au Gratin and substitute salsify root. Fannie Farmer says to cook it so: “Wash, scrape, and put at once into cold acidulated water to prevent discoloration. Cut in inch slices, cook in boiling salted water until soft, drain”.

Quail à la Moquin is presumably named after restauranteur Henri Mouquin. Mouquin came to New York from Switzerland, via Paris, and began his career as a waiter at the famed Delmonico’s. Mouquin opened three restaurants in New York, with his wife, Marie Granjean as chef. She is credited with introducing French onion soup to the United States.

There are two recipes for Marguerites in The Boston Cookery-School Cook Book. Both look like sweet little treats. One is a pastry and the other is more like divinity, but baked on saltines!

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!