February 19

02-19

St. Germain Soup
Beefsteak with Oyster Blanket
Spinach
Stuffed Potatoes
*Frangipan Cream Pie
Coffee

In 1914 February 19 was a Thursday.

It’s my birthday! As a special treat for you all, I cooked today’s featured recipe, Frangipan Cream Pie.

It’s three layers of pie crust with a custardy filling in between.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

February 11

02-11
Appledore Soup
Toasted Crackers
Broiled Schrod
Spanish Potatoes
Moulded Spinach
Radishes
*Banana Pie
Coffee

In 1914 February 11 was a Wednesday.

Appledore Soup is just potato soup with some ketchup stirred in. The name comes from Appledore House, a hotel on the Isles of Shoals, Maine. For many years the cook there was Maria Parloa, who wrote The Appledore Cook Book and was one of the first instructors at The Boston Cooking School.

What is schrod? Also spelled “scrod”, it’s a young whitefish, usually too small to be filleted. These days, scrod is the term used for any young whitefish, but Fannie Farmer specifically says it is a young cod and that haddock can be dressed the same.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

February 4, Vegetable Menu

02-04
French Fried Potatoes
*Corn Soufflé
Spinach à la Béchamel
Dressed Lettuce with Pimiento Ribbons
Baked Indian Pudding
Wafer Crackers
Cream Cheese
Café Noir

In 1914 February 4 was a Wednesday.

An all-vegetable meal must have been so unusual that it got its own special day.

Wafer Crackers were whole wheat crackers made by the Johnson Educator Food Company in Boston.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 13

01-13
Royal Soup
Imperial Sticks
Breaded Lamb Chops, Tomato Sauce
*Baked Potatoes, Hotel Style
Moulded Spinach
Wafer Crackers
Cream Cheese
Bar-le-duc Strawberries
Café Noir

In 1914 January 13 was a Tuesday.

Royal Soup with Imperial Sticks sounds so grand! The reality is a very frugal soup with toasted stale bread.

I found a recipe for Breaded Mutton Chops, but not lamb. It should work about the same, maybe with a shortened cooking time.

Bar-le-Duc strawberries are a kind of preserve. The town is famous for their currant preserves, in which the ripe currants are hand-seeded using a goose quill, leaving the fruit intact, like little pearls or caviar. I’m told that they pop delightfully in your mouth, but I haven’t been lucky enough to taste it. I also haven’t found much information about the strawberry version, but I assume it was just as delicious and just as much of a status symbol.

UPDATE: Canning, Preserving and Pickling by Marion Harris Neil (1914) has a recipe!

STRAWBERRY BAR-LE-DUC, p. 124
Perfect strawberries. Sugar.
Three things are indispensable in making strawberry bar-le-duc. The first is strong, steady sunshine, the second, hot platters or plates, the third plenty of window-glass.
The fruit should be of good flavor, the sugar pure. To every pound of fruit allow three cupfuls of sugar. Heat the sugar on plates in the oven, taking care not to let it melt or get too brown. It should be as hot as possible without melting.
Spread a thin layer of hot sugar over the bottoms of hot platters or deep plates, then a layer of fruit and then another layer of sugar.
Cover the platters with a clean sheet of window-glass and place outdoors in the hot sun or in a sunny window. If the fruit is outdoors it must be brought in when the sun sets and put in a dry place indoors.
Return to the sun in the morning. In a few days the fruit will grow plump and firm and the syrup almost a jelly.
Pack in tumblers and seal.
If the syrup is not thick, boil until clear and thickened, then pour in the glasses over the fruit.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed in my quest for greater historical accuracy in my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 9

01-09

Berkshire Soup
Crisp Crackers
Baked Cod, Oyster Stuffing
*O’Brion Potatoes
Moulded Spinach
Orange Puffs, Orange Sauce

In 1914 January 9 was a Friday. And we’ve got fish again!

I presume Berkshire Soup is named for the picturesque region in Western Massachusetts and not the county in England.

O’Brion Potatoes (usually spelled O’Brien) might have originated in Boston at the turn of the 20th century, or maybe New York. One more thing for the two cities to squabble over… The recipe usually calls for bell peppers, but here it’s canned pimientos. 

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed in my quest for greater historical accuracy in my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!

January 2

01-02

Baked Stuffed Haddock, Egg Sauce
Julienne Potatoes
Moulded Spinach
*Tomato and Celery Salad
Cheese Wafers
Steamed Graham PuddingFoamy Sauce

In 1914 January 2 was a Friday. The main dish is fish, not a surprise in New England where fish was abundant. Let’s see if fish on Friday becomes a trend

The Cheese Wafers are made with zephyrettes — a brand of cracker made by the National Biscuit Company (formerly the Kennedy Biscuit Company in Cambridge, MA). Any light, crisp cracker should do.

M2This project is supported by my Patrons on Patreon and donations from other enthusiasts of historic cookery. With your help I can acquire the unusual ingredients and equipment and do the research needed to continue my culinary adventures. Thank you so much!